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International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.
As part of a five-year project of the Enhanced Data Dissemination Initiative (EDDI) 2 Government Finance Statistics (GFS) Module on improving GFS and public-sector debt statistics in selected African countries, a mission was conducted in Harare, Zimbabwe during April 15–26, 2019. This mission was a follow up on a 2018 GFS technical assistance (TA) mission under the EDDI 2. The mission’s objective was to review progress made and assisting with outstanding statistical issues that are important for sound policymaking in Zimbabwe. Some of the key outstanding issues raised by the IMF African Department prior to the mission were, the classification of government subsidies to state owned enterprises (SOEs); the identification of extrabudgetary units (EBUs) and classification of their operations; and the correct classification of other government transactions in line with a Government Finance Statistics Manual (GFSM) 2014 framework.
International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.
This Technical Assistance Report discusses that the authorities are making some progress towards higher quality and more comprehensive Government Finance Statistics, however, sufficient information for meaningful monitoring and surveillance of the public sector in Zimbabwe should be considered a long-term goal with several remaining challenges. The government of Zimbabwe has recently embarked upon an ambitious reform program for public sector corporations, which is expected to lead to a dramatic reduction in government balance sheet risk via contingent liabilities and the direct fiscal impact arising from the high likelihood of those guarantees being called. The report also highlights that the Accountant General office should have the ability to set a standardized format and the required information for general government financial statements which are to be reported for all subsectors and ministries. The mission recommends that the authorities review compliance with Republic of Zimbabwe Public Finance Management Act of 2009 across general government subsectors, including, all local government units, Extrabudgetary Units funds and social security funds.
International Monetary Fund. Strategy, Policy, &, Review Department, International Monetary Fund. Finance Dept., and International Monetary Fund. Legal Dept.
This paper reviews progress under the Fund’s strengthened cooperative strategy on overdue financial obligations. The level of overdue obligations to the Fund declined and their structure has remained broadly unchanged since the last review. Total overdue obligations to the Fund at end-June 2017 amounted to SDR 1,205.7 million, a decline of about SDR 100 million from the end-June 2012 level, when the strategy was reviewed last. All overdue obligations to the Fund at end-June 2017 were due to two protracted overdue obligations cases. Sudan accounts for the bulk of the overdue obligations to the Fund (80 percent), and Somalia for the remainder. Zimbabwe, which was in protracted overdue obligations to the PRGT at the time of the last Review, settled its overdue obligations to the PRGT on October 20, 2016.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

2017 Article IV Consultation-Press Release; Staff Report; and Statement by the Executive Director for Zimbabwe

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This 2017 Article IV Consultation highlights that Zimbabwe’s economy is facing difficulties. A severe drought and slow reform momentum have led to high expenditure levels since late 2015 despite subdued revenues. With limited access to foreign inflows, the ensuing fiscal imbalances have become unsustainable, and are being financed by rising domestic borrowing. Growth in 2017 is expected to be supported by a strong performance in agriculture mainly owing to exceptional rains. However, economic activity in the medium term is projected to remain subdued, pending adjustment and reform that tackle the structural challenges and enable the economy to restore fiscal and external sustainability and achieve its growth potential.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

2017 Article IV Consultation-Press Release; Staff Report; and Statement by the Executive Director for Zimbabwe

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Context. The authorities met all their commitments under the Staff-Monitored Program (SMP), despite economic and financial difficulties. Inadequate external inflows, lower commodity prices, the dollar appreciation, and the El-Niño-induced drought hurt economic activity. The authorities have started to rationalize civil service by exploiting opportunities for cost savings, amended the Public Financial Management and Procurement Acts for Parliament and Cabinet approval, respectively, and rid the financial sector of problem banks and reduced non-performing loans. They garnered broad support for their reengagement strategy from creditors and development partners, in particular their plans to clear arrears to the International Financial Institutions.

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper discusses recent developments, outlook, and risks related to the economy of Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe’s economic difficulties have deepened. GDP growth slowed significantly to 1.1 percent in 2015, mainly because of the impact of adverse weather conditions on agricultural output, and power generation. The current account balance improved in 2015, because of lower prices for oil imports, subdued economic activity, and fiscal consolidation efforts. Fiscal performance in 2015 was better than programmed, despite the adverse macroeconomic environment. Despite spending pressures to mitigate the impact of the drought, the authorities remain committed to fiscal discipline; they target a primary cash deficit of 0.2 percent of GDP for 2016.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Context. The authorities met all their commitments under the Staff-Monitored Program (SMP), despite economic and financial difficulties. Inadequate external inflows, lower commodity prices, the dollar appreciation, and the El-Niño-induced drought hurt economic activity. The authorities have started to rationalize civil service by exploiting opportunities for cost savings, amended the Public Financial Management and Procurement Acts for Parliament and Cabinet approval, respectively, and rid the financial sector of problem banks and reduced non-performing loans. They garnered broad support for their reengagement strategy from creditors and development partners, in particular their plans to clear arrears to the International Financial Institutions.

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Context. The authorities met all their commitments under the Staff-Monitored Program (SMP), despite economic and financial difficulties. Inadequate external inflows, lower commodity prices, the dollar appreciation, and the El-Niño-induced drought hurt economic activity. The authorities have started to rationalize civil service by exploiting opportunities for cost savings, amended the Public Financial Management and Procurement Acts for Parliament and Cabinet approval, respectively, and rid the financial sector of problem banks and reduced non-performing loans. They garnered broad support for their reengagement strategy from creditors and development partners, in particular their plans to clear arrears to the International Financial Institutions.