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International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
At the request of the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe (RBZ), the Monetary and Capital Markets (MCM) Department conducted a virtual mission from May 3 to June 10, 2022 to assist the RBZ on strengthening consolidated supervision framework. The main focus was to support the RBZ in updating the RBZ consolidated supervision framework, enhancing prudential reporting on a consolidated basis, strengthening the assessment of banking group’s risks, and intensifying cross-border and interagency cooperation.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
As a follow-up to the 2019 FSSR, a remote TA mission supported the RBZ with the implementation of Basel III liquidity standards. The mission reviewed the RBZ drafts of the LCR and NSFR frameworks, discussed identified material gaps with the BSD management and relevant supervisors, and provided many recommendations on enhancing the drafts of liquidity regulations, monitoring tools, reporting templates, and disclosure. Further actions for implementing Basel III liquidity standards were agreed with the RBZ.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper discusses the Staff-Monitored Program (SMP) for Zimbabwe and highlights that the new government that assumed office following the July 2018 elections is committed to addressing the macroeconomic imbalances, removing structural distortions to facilitate a resumption in growth, and to re-engaging with the international community including by clearing its external arrears. The SMP will be monitored on a quarterly basis and is intended to assist the authorities in building a track record of implementation of a coherent set of economic and social policies that can facilitate a return to macroeconomic stability and assist in reengagement with the international community. With limited access to external financing and the very low level of international reserves, the authorities’ room for manoeuvre is very narrow. There are also significant implementation risks of the monetary and exchange rate reforms, as well as addressing governance and corruption weaknesses, which could adversely impact the attainment of SMP objectives.
International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.
In response to a request from the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe (RBZ), and with the support of the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF’s) African Department (AFR), a monetary and financial statistics (MFS) technical assistance mission visited Harare, Zimbabwe, during October 16–27, 2017. The mission’s main objective was to assist the RBZ in finalizing its work of compiling MFS of the Central Bank (CB) and Other Depository Corporations (ODCs) in accordance with the Monetary and Financial Statistics Manual and Compilation Guide (MFSMCG). Compilation of these data will lead to the regular reporting of improved monetary data for publication in International Financial Statistics (IFS) and provide MFS data for use by the IMF African Department (AFR) and the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe in their research and publications.
International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

In response to a request from the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe (RBZ), and with the support of the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF’s) African Department (AFR), a monetary and financial statistics (MFS) technical assistance mission visited Harare, Zimbabwe, during October 16–27, 2017. The mission’s main objective was to assist the RBZ in finalizing its work of compiling MFS of the Central Bank (CB) and Other Depository Corporations (ODCs) in accordance with the Monetary and Financial Statistics Manual and Compilation Guide (MFSMCG). Compilation of these data will lead to the regular reporting of improved monetary data for publication in International Financial Statistics (IFS) and provide MFS data for use by the IMF African Department (AFR) and the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe in their research and publications.

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Abstract

The macroeconomic outlook for sub-Saharan Africa continues to strengthen. Growth is expected to increase from 2.7 percent in 2017 to 3.1 percent in 2018, reflecting domestic policy adjustments and a supportive external environment, including continued steady growth in the global economy, higher commodity prices, and accommodative external financing conditions. Inflation is abating; and fiscal imbalances are being contained in many countries. Over the medium term, and on current policies, growth is expected to accelerate to about 4 percent, too low to create the number of jobs needed to absorb anticipated new entrants into labor markets.

Mr. Francesco Grigoli and Adrian Robles
The linearity of the relationship between income inequality and economic development has been long questioned. While theory provides arguments for which the shape of relationship may be positive for low levels of inequality and negative for high ones, most of the empirical literature assumes a linear specification finding conflicting results. Employing an innovative empirical approach robust to endogeneity, we find pervasive evidence of nonlinearities. In particular, similar to the debt overhang literature, we identify an inequality overhang level in that the slope of the relationship between income inequality and economic development switches from positive to negative at a net Gini of about 27 percent. We also find that in an environment characterized by widespread financial inclusion and high income concentration, rising income inequality has a larger negative impact on economic development because banks may curtail credit to customers at the lower end of the income distribution. On the positive side, a sufficiently high female labor participation can act as a shock absorber reducing such negative impact, possibly through a more efficient allocation of resources.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper discusses recent developments, outlook, and risks related to the economy of Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe’s economic difficulties have deepened. GDP growth slowed significantly to 1.1 percent in 2015, mainly because of the impact of adverse weather conditions on agricultural output, and power generation. The current account balance improved in 2015, because of lower prices for oil imports, subdued economic activity, and fiscal consolidation efforts. Fiscal performance in 2015 was better than programmed, despite the adverse macroeconomic environment. Despite spending pressures to mitigate the impact of the drought, the authorities remain committed to fiscal discipline; they target a primary cash deficit of 0.2 percent of GDP for 2016.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Context. The authorities met all their commitments under the Staff-Monitored Program (SMP), despite economic and financial difficulties. Inadequate external inflows, lower commodity prices, the dollar appreciation, and the El-Niño-induced drought hurt economic activity. The authorities have started to rationalize civil service by exploiting opportunities for cost savings, amended the Public Financial Management and Procurement Acts for Parliament and Cabinet approval, respectively, and rid the financial sector of problem banks and reduced non-performing loans. They garnered broad support for their reengagement strategy from creditors and development partners, in particular their plans to clear arrears to the International Financial Institutions.