Africa > Zimbabwe

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 42 items for :

  • Aggregate Factor Income Distribution x
Clear All
Charles Vellutini and Juan Carlos Benitez
This paper presents a novel technique to measure and compare the redistributive capacity of observed tax (or transfer) policies. The technique is based on income distribution simulations and controls for differences in pre-tax income distributions. It assumes that the only information on the pre-tax distribution available in each country-year is the Gini coefficient and the mean (GDP per capita). We illustrate the technique with an application to the personal income tax, using a dataset of 108 countries over the 2007-2018 period.
Mario Pessoa, Andrew Okello, Artur Swistak, Muyangwa Muyangwa, Virginia Alonso-Albarran, and Vincent de Paul Koukpaizan
The value-added tax (VAT) has the potential to generate significant government revenue. Despite its intrinsic self-enforcement capacity, many tax administrations find it challenging to refund excess input credits, which is critical to a well-functioning VAT system. Improperly functioning VAT refund practices can have profound implications for fiscal policy and management, including inaccurate deficit measurement, spending overruns, poor budget credibility, impaired treasury operations, and arrears accumulation.This note addresses the following issues: (1) What are VAT refunds and why should they be managed properly? (2) What practices should be put in place (in tax policy, tax administration, budget and treasury management, debt, and fiscal statistics) to help manage key aspects of VAT refunds? For a refund mechanism to be credible, the tax administration must ensure that it is equipped with the strategies, processes, and abilities needed to identify VAT refund fraud. It must also be prepared to act quickly to combat such fraud/schemes.
Mr. Francesco Grigoli and Adrian Robles
The linearity of the relationship between income inequality and economic development has been long questioned. While theory provides arguments for which the shape of relationship may be positive for low levels of inequality and negative for high ones, most of the empirical literature assumes a linear specification finding conflicting results. Employing an innovative empirical approach robust to endogeneity, we find pervasive evidence of nonlinearities. In particular, similar to the debt overhang literature, we identify an inequality overhang level in that the slope of the relationship between income inequality and economic development switches from positive to negative at a net Gini of about 27 percent. We also find that in an environment characterized by widespread financial inclusion and high income concentration, rising income inequality has a larger negative impact on economic development because banks may curtail credit to customers at the lower end of the income distribution. On the positive side, a sufficiently high female labor participation can act as a shock absorber reducing such negative impact, possibly through a more efficient allocation of resources.
International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Growth in sub-Saharan Africa has weakened after more than a decade of solid growth, although this overall outlook masks considerable variation across the region. Some countries have been negatively affected by falling prices of their main commodity exports. Oil-exporting countries, including Nigeria and Angola, have been hit hard by falling revenues and the resulting fiscal adjustments, while middle-income countries such as Ghana, South Africa, and Zambia are also facing unfavorable conditions. This October 2015 report discusses the fiscal and monetary policy adjustments necessary for these countries to adapt to the new environment. Chapter 2 looks at competitiveness in the region, analyzing the substantial trade integration that accompanied the recent period of high growth, and policy actions to nurture new sources of growth. Chapter 3 looks at the implications for the region of persistently high income and gender inequality and ways to reduce them.

Mr. Marc G Quintyn and Sophia Gollwitzer
This paper tests the theoretical framework developed by North, Wallis and Weingast (2009) on the transition from closed to open access societies. They posit that societies need to go through three doorsteps: (i) the establishment of rule of law among elites; (ii) the adoption of perpetually existing organizations; and (iii) the political control of the military. We identify indicators reflecting these doorsteps and graphically test the correlation between them and a set of political and economic variables. Finally, through Identification through Heteroskedasticity we test these relationships econometrically. The paper broadly confirms the logic behind the doorsteps as necessary steps in the transition to open access societies. The doorsteps influence economic and political processes, as well as each other, with varying intensity. We also identify income inequality as a potentially important force leading to social change.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Abstract

Tout porte à croire que l’année en cours sera, elle aussi, une année encourageante pour la plupart des pays d’Afrique subsaharienne. Sous l’effet surtout du dynamisme de la demande intérieure mais aussi du niveau élevé des cours des produits de base, l’économie de la région devrait croître de plus de 5¼ % en 2011. Pour 2012, selon les projections de référence des services du FMI, la croissance régionale devrait être supérieure à 5¾ %, compte tenu notamment des mesures ponctuelles prises par plusieurs pays pour stimuler la production. Mais il y a des fantômes au banquet : la hausse des prix mondiaux des produits de l’alimentation et de l’énergie, amplifiée par la sécheresse qui sévit par endroits, a mis à mal les budgets des pauvres et a provoqué une poussée d’inflation, et les hésitations de la reprise mondiale menacent d’assombrir les perspectives d’exportation et de croissance. Les projections régionales pour 2012 reposent en grande partie sur l’hypothèse que le rythme de croissance de l’économie mondiale se maintiendra autour de 4 %. Si la croissance continue de ralentir dans les pays avancés et que la demande mondiale s’en trouve freinée, l’expansion en cours dans la région connaîtra vraisemblablement de grandes difficultés, les pays les plus exposés étant probablement ceux qui sont plus intégrés à l’économie mondiale. Au cours des mois à venir, les autorités devront gérer un équilibre délicat entre, d’une part, la nécessité d’affronter les défis engendrés par la vigueur de la croissance et les récents chocs exogènes et, d’autre part, celle d’éviter les effets négatifs d’un nouveau ralentissement de l’activité mondiale. Dans certains pays moins dynamiques, qui sont surtout des pays à revenu intermédiaire et où la liberté d’action des autorités n’est pas soumise à des contraintes financières, il est clair que les pouvoirs publics doivent continuer de soutenir la croissance de la production, à plus forte raison si la croissance mondiale vacille. Pour autant que l’économie mondiale connaisse, comme prévu aujourd’hui, une croissance régulière mais faible, la plupart des pays à faible revenu de la région devraient fonder résolument leur politique budgétaire sur des considérations de moyen terme, tout en resserrant leur politique monétaire partout où l’inflation hors alimentation a dépassé 10 %. En cas de ralentissement de l’activité mondiale, sous réserve des contraintes de financement, ces pays devraient s’attacher à maintenir les initiatives de dépenses déjà prévues, en laissant jouer les stabilisateurs automatiques du côté des recettes. En ce qui concerne les pays exportateurs de pétrole, l’amélioration des termes de l’échange offre une bonne occasion de constituer des marges de manœuvre pour parer à un regain de volatilité des prix.

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Abstract

This year looks set to be another encouraging one for most sub-Saharan African economies. Reflecting mainly strong demand but also elevated commodity prices, the region's economy is set to expand by more than 5¼ percent in 2011. For 2012, the IMF staff's baseline projection is for growth to be higher at 5¾ percent, owing to one-off boosts to production in a number of countries. There are, however, specters at the feast: the increase in global food and fuel prices, amplified by drought affecting parts of the region, has hit the budgets of the poor and sparked rising inflation, and hesitations in the global recovery threaten to weaken export and growth prospects. The projection for 2012 for the region is highly contingent on global economic growth being sustained at about 4 percent. A further slowing of growth in advanced economies, curtailing global demand, would generate significant headwinds for the region's ongoing expansion, with more globally integrated countries likely to be most affected. Policies in the coming months need to tread a fine line between addressing the challenges that strong growth and recent exogenous shocks have engendered and warding off the adverse effects of another global downturn. In some slower-growing, mostly middle-income countries without binding financial constraints, policies should clearly remain supportive of output growth, even more so if global growth sputters. Provided the global economy experiences the currently predicted slow and steady growth, most of the region's low-income countries should focus squarely on medium-term considerations in setting fiscal policy while tightening monetary policy wherever nonfood inflation has climbed above single digits. In the event of a global downturn, subject to financing constraints, policies in these countries should focus on maintaining planned spending initiatives, while allowing automatic stabilizers to operate on the revenue side. For the region's oil exporters, better terms of trade provide a good opportunity to build up policy buffers against further price volatility.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The IMF's 2010 Annual Report chronicles the response of the Fund's Executive Board and staff to the global financial crisis and other events during financial year 2010, which covers the period from May 1, 2009, through April 30, 2010. The print version of the Report is available in eight languages (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish), along with a CD-ROM (available in English only) that includes the Report text and ancillary materials, including the Fund's Financial Statements for FY2010.

International Monetary Fund
The IMFC in its April 2010 Communiqué pledged to complete the 14th Quota Review before January 2011 in line with the parameters agreed in Istanbul. The Committee of the Whole (COW) has since continued its work aimed at developing proposals that could command broad support. At its most recent meeting in September, there was a shared commitment to reaching an agreement within the agreed timetable but views remained divided on many issues. To facilitate progress towards the agreed goal, this paper suggests possible elements that could help form the basis for an agreement. These elements seek to build on the discussions to date and balance the diverse views that have been expressed. Inevitably, they will not fully meet the preferences or priorities of any individual member, and difficult compromises will be required from all sides if an agreement is to be reached.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Abstract

Sub-Saharan Africa's prospects have deteriorated somewhat and the risks have increased, according to this report. Growth in the region is projected to dip to 6 percent in 2008 and 2009. The fall is due mainly to the global food and fuel price shock, which has weighed particularly on growth in oil-importing countries, and to the global financial market turmoil, which has slowed global growth and demand for Africa's exports. Inflation is expected to rise to 12 percent in 2008, mainly on account of the food and fuel price shock. As a result of rising prices, particularly of food, poverty may well be on the increase in 2008. In 2009, inflation should ease to 10 percent, helped by recent commodity price declines. There are significant risks to the outlook related to a potentially deeper and longer period of global financial turmoil and resulting slowdown in global activity, and substantial uncertainty concerning commodity prices.