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International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This Selected Issues paper investigates state-owned financial institutions’ (SOFIs) performance in developing economies. It focuses on Sub-Saharan Africa, zooming in on the Togolese experience with SOFIs and privatization, at a time when the Togolese government has decided to further disengage from the financial sector. Typically set up with a public interest and financial inclusion mandate, SOFIs tend to weaken financial stability and fiscal discipline in developing economies, especially if they are not typically regulated and supervised on the same basis as other banks. Togo’s and cross-country experiences suggest that performance improves more after privatization when the government fully relinquishes control, when banks are privatized to strategic investors rather than through share issues, and when bidding is open to all, including foreign banks. The success of privatization also hinges on the business environment for competition, governance, and entry, on banks’ valuation and how policy concerns are dealt with, as well as on owner’s prudential review quality.
International Monetary Fund
This report provides a summary of the Antimoney Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) measures in effect in the Union of the Comoros on the date of or shortly after the onsite visit. It describes and analyzes these measures, indicates the level of the Union of the Comoros’s compliance with the 40 + 9 Financial Action Task Force (FATF) Recommendations, and makes recommendations on measures to be taken to strengthen certain aspects of the system. The authorities agreed with the mission that the Comoros is a potential transit point for international terrorism.
International Monetary Fund
In March 2009, the Fund established a new Framework Administered Account to administer external financial resources for selected Fund activities (the “SFA Instrument”). The financing of activities under the terms of the SFA Instrument is implemented through the establishment and operation of a subaccount within the SFA. The subaccount for the East Africa Regional Technical Assistance Center (AFRITAC East) would be the third one under the SFA. This paper requests Executive Board approval to establish the AFRITAC East subaccount under the terms of the SFA Instrument.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Ex Post Assessment (EPA) of Longer-Term Program Engagement paper for Kenya. This EPA focuses on 1993–2007, when Kenya was engaged in four successive IMF arrangements. Macroeconomic policy design was broadly appropriate, and implementation was generally sound. Growth slowed in the 1990s, but picked up after the 2002 elections, reflecting buoyant global conditions, structural reforms, and a surge of private capital inflows. Monetary policies were complicated by a reluctance to allow for full interest and exchange rate flexibility.
International Monetary Fund
A sound fiscal stance has been the bedrock for Tanzania’s macroeconomic stability in recent years. Impressive increases in government revenues, together with substantial donor support, allowed for strong increases in government spending, without excessive recourse to domestic borrowing that could create pressures on monetary policy or crowd out private sector borrowing. To ensure a smooth implementation of the budget, further work is required to strengthen cash management. In addition, local government budget planning and execution remains weak and needs to be strengthened.
International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This third edition of the Global Monitoring Report examines the commitments and actions of donors, international financial institutions, and developing countries to implement the Millennium Declaration, signed by 189 countries in 2000. Many countries are off track to meet the Millennium Development Goals, particularly in Africa and South Asia, but new evidence is emerging that higher-quality aid and a better policy environment are accelerating progress in some countries, and that the benefits of this progress are reaching poor families. This report takes a closer look at the donors' 2005 commitments to aid and debt relief, and argues that rigorous, sustained monitoring is needed to ensure that they are met and deliver results, and to prevent the cycle of accumulating unsustainable debt from repeating itself. International financial institutions need to focus on development outcomes rather than inputs, and strengthen their capacity to manage for results in developing countries.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The Handbook presents an overall analytical framework for assessing financial system stability and developmental needs, providing broad guidance on approaches, methodologies, and techniques of assessing financial systems. Although the Handbook draws substantially on World Bank and IMF experience with the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) and from the broader policy and operational work in both institutions, it is designed for generic use in financial sector assessments, whether conducted by country authorities themselves, or by World Bank and IMF teams.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper explores why increased aid flows require economic policymakers to confront some specific issues. Ensuring that increased aid promotes growth and reduces poverty is certainly the most important task. Empirical studies offer only mild support for aid-boosting growth. However, one study suggests that once one excludes the aid flows aimed at political and humanitarian goals, a positive net effect is observed for the remaining aid focused on economic objectives. This paper also outlines the roles to be played by development partners for making the aid being properly utilized for boosting growth.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
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