Social Science > Poverty and Homelessness

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International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This Economic Development Document summarizes Mauritania’s Strategy for Accelerated Growth and Shared Prosperity (SCAPP) for 2016–30. The first five-year phase of the SCAPP will complete projects under way and lay the foundations for a new, politically more peaceful Mauritania, with infrastructure put in place to support growth and encourage development of the country's natural resources. Steps will be taken to complete the reforms needed to improve the business climate and promote the private sector. In the second five-year period, the economy will be more diversified and competitive, with the real rate of growth averaging at about 10 percent a year. The third five-year phase will consolidate Mauritania's “new look” and the economic growth will exceed 12 percent a year.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This Selected Issues paper analyzes the macro-fiscal implications of an increase in infrastructure spending, considering Israel’s dual economy character. The efficiency of investment is key to ensuring growth benefits are achieved and to containing increases in the public debt ratio. Selecting projects with low rates of return, managing public investment inefficiently, or raising investment faster than absorptive capacity, can lead to weaker growth benefits and higher debt ratios that reduce the room to sustain increased public investment. Growth benefits will likely be insufficient to prevent a significant increase in debt ratios, indicating a need for revenue measures, where reductions in tax benefits are preferable. Allowing the public debt ratio to rise as much as 10 percentage points appears too high as Israel faces wider uncertainties than most advanced economies and it should also preserve fiscal space to facilitate structural reforms for long-term growth. Given Israel’s very low civilian spending, the government should consider financing most of the additional investment with additional revenues. Israel’s sizable foregone revenue from various tax benefits—around 5 percent of GDP per year—suggests significant scope for revenue gains. Our analysis also suggests that reducing tax benefits is least detrimental to growth, which in turn would be most positive for debt dynamics.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This Selected Issues paper on Kosovo discusses various challenges and opportunities in the public infrastructure domain. Given the very low initial stocks, largely due to the sharp depletion of capital stock during the conflicts in the 1990s, higher investment rates are needed. The resources available from international development partners, including the European Union (EU), the European Investment Bank and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, are a unique opportunity to leverage and accelerate the implementation of priority projects. Strengthening Kosovo’s investment framework is key to achieving this objective. Kosovo faces significant public infrastructure gaps, which constrain private sector development. Scaling-up public investment will raise gross domestic product growth potential and accelerate income convergence toward the EU average level. The priority project list has helped the authorities to prioritize plans and facilitate the discussions and negotiations with donors and International Financial Institutions (IFI). However, implementation so far has been modest, despite the new investment clause of the fiscal rule exempting IFI-financed projects from the deficit ceiling.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
The NDP aims at transforming Côte d’Ivoire into an emerging market and halving the poverty rate. The framework for poverty reduction can be improved by developing a program of targeted interventions to support growth in key strategic sectors, public investment management, maintaining fiscal and debt sustainability and implementation of energy sector reforms. The fiscal strategy focuses on scaling up public investment and sustainability. The public sector investment program and the macroeconomic projections of the PND are a good strategy. Risks to successful implementation are exogenous shocks, resistance to structural reforms, and sociopolitical instability in the country.
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
Executive Directors commend Bangladesh in addressing the major challenges to growth and poverty reduction. The strategy is comprehensive and confronts the key issues impeding sustainable development and inclusive growth in Bangladesh. Implementing sound macro-financial policies, intensifying revenue mobilization, improving the business environment, ensuring trade liberalization, and improving governance and accountability are top priorities. Actions should be sequenced according to these priorities. Severe external shocks could reignite macroeconomic pressures and undermine socioeconomic targets.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
Bangladesh’s second Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper -- “Steps Towards Change: National Strategy for Accelerated Poverty Reduction II (NSAPR II)” – provides a framework for implementing the government’s agenda during FY09-FY11. First prepared by a Caretaker government,1 the NSAPR II was later revised by the current elected government to reflect its priorities. The NSAPR II outlines five strategic priorities and describes the supporting strategies to achieve them. This Joint Staff Advisory Note (JSAN) provides feedback on priority areas for strengthening the NSAPR II and its implementation.
International Monetary Fund
This Joint Staff Advisory Note reviews the first annual progress report (APR) on implementation of the Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRS) in the Republic of Congo. The adoption of Congo’s first full Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper was an important step toward consolidating macroeconomic stability and improved political and economic governance. The APR takes stock of the first year of PRS monitoring and implementation, and provides an update on the poverty diagnosis, and elaborates on the central aspects of the strategy.
International Monetary Fund
This Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper for Nicaragua reports that the most pressing demand for the majority of Nicaraguans is employment generation and economic growth. The National Development Plan (NDP) gives priority to actions that improve the investment climate and promote productive development—considering the competitive potential of the territories—giving a better position to Nicaragua in the trading world through increased foreign investment. The NDP establishes a more effective regulatory framework, and promotes competition and a legal framework that guarantees property rights and lowers domestic transaction costs.
International Monetary Fund
This Joint Staff Advisory Note examines Congo’s Interim Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (I-PRSP). The I-PRSP recognizes the lack of recent and good quality data on poverty, and recommends new surveys and studies to improve poverty assessment and analysis. On the basis of the sparsely available data, the I-PRSP estimates that at least 50 percent of the population is poor. The I-PRSP also links the high poverty incidence to a significant decline in per capita output and the deterioration of basic social services.
International Monetary Fund
The attached Joint Staff Assessment (JSA) of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) on Djibouti reviews poverty reduction objectives and strategies. The authorities invested considerable effort in building national ownership of the PRSP by strengthening the institutional framework. The authorities made a special effort toward filling the knowledge gap on poverty that was identified in the I-PRSP. The staff of the World Bank and the IMF considers that Djibouti’s poverty reduction strategy outlined in the PRSP provides a sound basis for IMF and the International Development Association (IDA) concessional assistance.