Africa > Sierra Leone

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International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
Sierra Leone has made significant strides to rebuild its public infrastructure after the devastating civil war, but the desperate infrastructure needs remain. At the end of the conflict in 2002, the country was left with virtually no infrastructure. Redevelopment of public infrastructure was ignited by the mining boom, which started in the late 2000s. Over the period 2008−18, public investment averaged 6.5 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), which has translated into an estimated capital stock of about 65 percent in constant 2011 GDP. However, a level of public investment is still lower than neighboring countries by about one percentage point. The level of capital stock per capita is one of the lowest in the region, only slightly above that of Liberia. Some districts still have no paved roads, no electricity, and no water systems, almost 20 years after the war.
International Monetary Fund
Better designed and implemented fiscal regimes for oil, gas, and mining can make a substantial contribution to the revenue needs of many developing countries while ensuring an attractive return for investors, according to a new policy paper from the International Monetary Fund. Revenues from extractive industries (EIs) have major macroeconomic implications. The EIs account for over half of government revenues in many petroleum-rich countries, and for over 20 percent in mining countries. About one-third of IMF member countries find (or could find) resource revenues “macro-critical” – especially with large numbers of recent new discoveries and planned oil, gas, and mining developments. IMF policy advice and technical assistance in the field has massively expanded in recent years – driven by demand from member countries and supported by increased donor finance. The paper sets out the analytical framework underpinning, and key elements of, the country-specific advice given. Also available in Arabic: ????? ??????? ?????? ???????? ???????????: ??????? ???????? Also available in French: Régimes fiscaux des industries extractives: conception et application Also available in Spanish: Regímenes fiscales de las industrias extractivas: Diseño y aplicación
Ms. Alexandra Tabova and Ms. Carol L Baker
Non-oil growth in the CFA oil exporting countries has been lackluster despite their great natural resource wealth. In this paper we study the key determinants of non-oil growth and explore to what extent these countries differ from countries with comparable levels of development that do not depend on nonrenewable resources. Using a panel of 38 countries comprising LICs and CFA zone oil exporters, we find that while real exchange rate appreciation negatively impacted growth in all countries over the period 1985-2008, what distinguishes the oil producers of the CFA zone is the failure of public and private investment to spur non-oil growth.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Second Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF) program for Sierra Leone. Performance under the IMF-supported program was mixed. Output growth was strong at 6.8 percent and broad-based, but key fiscal revenue and spending objectives were missed, and progress on the structural reform front was slow. The authorities’ program for 2008 aims to mobilize more domestic revenue; reorient public spending to infrastructure projects and poverty-reducing programs; prevent rapid accumulation of public debt; and accelerate implementation of structural reforms.