Middle East and Central Asia > Qatar

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • Type: Journal Issue x
  • Public investments x
Clear All Modify Search
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This 2016 Article IV Consultation highlights the adverse impact of lower hydrocarbon prices on the macroeconomic performance of Qatar. Growth has slowed despite still-resilient nonhydrocarbon activity. Real GDP growth of 2.7 percent is estimated for 2016. Inflation remained low despite subsidy cuts, averaging about 2.7 percent in 2016. Growth is expected to slow in the medium term as public investment growth tapers off and hydrocarbon output continues to slow. Further subsidy cuts, a moderate recovery in global commodity prices, and the introduction of a value-added tax are expected to improve the fiscal and external balances gradually over the near to medium term.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This 2015 Article IV Consultation highlights that Qatar is implementing an ambitious diversification strategy, while retaining its systemic role in the global natural gas market. Qatar accounts for one-third of global liquefied natural gas trade and has emerged as an important global financial investor, labor importer, and donor. The authorities are executing a large public infrastructure program to advance economic diversification and prepare for the FIFA 2022 World Cup. The economy has maintained strong growth momentum so far despite the large drop in oil prices since summer 2014. The short-term growth outlook is positive, but lower oil prices will lead to a substantial deterioration of the fiscal and external balances.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This 2014 Article IV Consultation highlights that Qatar’s macroeconomic performance has remained strong. GDP growth slowed from 13 percent in 2011 to 6.2 percent in 2012, mostly owing to the self-imposed moratorium on additional hydrocarbon production from the North Field. Growth was 6.5 percent in 2013, driven by strong expansion in the nonhydrocarbon sector. The negative spillovers from sluggish global growth and financial market volatility have been limited. The baseline macroeconomic outlook is positive. GDP growth could stay at about 6 percent in 2014, with public investments keeping growth at about 6–7 percent over the medium term.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This Selected Issues paper assesses efficiency of Qatar public investment. It discusses the trends in public capital spending and the rationale for improving public investment efficiency. The paper outlines three alternative methods for analyzing efficiency, and presents the main results. The results suggest that the efficiency of Qatar public investment spending is broadly comparable to GCC peers, but could be improved further. It is also concluded that strengthening fiscal institutions, particularly with an integrated public investment management process and a medium-term fiscal policy framework, is the key for improving public investment efficiency in Qatar.
Mr. Serhan Cevik
This paper investigates the empirical characteristics of business cycles and the extent of cyclical comovement in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, using various measures of synchronization for non-hydrocarbon GDP and constituents of aggregate demand during the period 1990-2010. By applying the Christiano-Fitzgerald asymmetric band-pass filter and a mean corrected concordance index, the paper identifies the degree of non-hydrocarbon business cycle synchronization?one of the main prerequisites for countries considering to establish a monetary union. The empirical results show low and heterogeneous synchronization in non-hydrocarbon business cycles across the GCC economies, and a decline in the degree of synchronicity in the 2000s, if Kuwait is excluded from the sample, partly because of divergent fiscal policies.