Political Science > Social Services and Welfare

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 84 items for :

  • Type: Journal Issue x
  • Money supply x
Clear All Modify Search
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper discusses Rwanda’s First Review Under the Policy Support Instrument. Rwanda continues to face the challenge of sustaining high growth while reducing its reliance on aid and preventing the build-up of imbalances. After using foreign exchange reserves over the past few years to support the economy, the room for maneuver is more limited and it will be important to rebuild policy buffers. Growth is projected to increase to 6 percent in 2014. In the short term, the need to support growth and preserve the level of foreign reserves requires a cautious fiscal stance while maintaining priority spending and leaving scope for private sector credit expansion.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
Tanzania’s economic growth continues to be buoyant. The planned monetary policy tightening is aimed at entrenching gradual disinflation. Executive Directors recommend further enhancing the degree of exchange rate flexibility, and the fiscal deficit reduction envisaged in the draft budget is welcomed. Implementation of the structural reform agenda needs to be reinvigorated. Although the medium-term outlook remains strong, short-term risks to the program are foreseen. There is progress in areas including health, higher education enrollment, and revenue collection, but challenges in poverty reduction remain.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
The article summarizes the positive economic development of Rwanda and its internal and external policies. Rwanda’s economy is referred to as a success story, but it also faces certain challenges. The country is focused on maintaining macroeconomic stability, sustaining sturdy growth, and reducing poverty without foreign dependence. Fiscal and monetary policies have played key roles in economic growth. External stability is manageable, as it has significant profit in the global market. The authorities review this remarkable success of Rwanda’s economy as a great achievement.
International Monetary Fund
Satisfactory implementation of the economic program supported by the Policy Support Instrument has helped Rwanda during the global economic downturn. The program focuses on maintaining a sustainable fiscal position; strengthening monetary and exchange rate policies; and supporting growth with structural reforms to diversify the export base and improve the business environment. The authorities are committed to assess the inflation to safeguard the gains made in macroeconomic stability that currently underpin the economic recovery. Executive Directors emphasized the need to maintain macroeconomic stability to achieve sustainable growth.
International Monetary Fund
Generally, macroeconomic performance has been as envisaged at the time of the program request. The near-term outlook has improved, despite uncertain global conditions. The new government of Solomon Islands remains committed to program targets and objectives agreed. The government’s efforts in adhering to program fiscal targets are commendable, as the main anchor to macroeconomic stability. Excess liquidity in the banking system and commodity price pressures continue to pose inflation risks. Strong adherence to the program would help anchor macroeconomic policy and address structural weaknesses.
International Monetary Fund
Rwanda has achieved high growth and macroeconomic stability under three successive Poverty Reduction Growth Facility (PRGF) arrangements. Executive Directors welcomed the new Private Sector Investment (PSI) program, which aims to consolidate macroeconomic stability and achieve sustained broad-based growth while reducing Rwanda’s aid dependency. They emphasized that this can be achieved by maintaining sustainable fiscal position, strengthening monetary and exchange rate policies, and supporting growth with structural reforms. In view of this, Directors approved a three-year PSI for Rwanda for preserving macroeconomic stability, consistent with the authority's poverty reduction and growth strategy, Economic Development and Poverty Reduction Strategy (EDPRS).
International Monetary Fund
Political pressure for faster delivery of tangible economic results has mounted against a backdrop of slower-than-expected economic growth, job losses in some sectors, and delays in infrastructure provision. Macroeconomic performance weakened in 2009 owing to the global recession, but tentative signs of a turnaround have emerged. Banking sector capitalization improved, though profitability remains low. FY2010 budget execution is broadly on track despite resource shortfalls. Medium-term prospects are favorable based on foreign investment commitments and continued donor support for rebuilding infrastructure and institutions.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Sixth Review Under the Policy Support Instrument (PSI) for the United Republic of Tanzania. All end-June 2009 quantitative performance/assessment criteria were met. Good progress has been achieved with structural reforms. The Executive Board approved the Fifth Review of the PSI and a 12-month arrangement under the high access component of the Exogenous Shocks Facility in the amount of SDR 218.79 million (110 percent of quota) on May 29, 2009.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Third Review for Liberia Under the Three-Year Arrangement Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF). The program remains on track. All performance criteria (PC) for end-June 2009 were met, except the PC on total revenue collection. IMF staff supports the authorities’ request for a waiver on the basis that the deviation was temporary and did not jeopardize key program objectives. Structural reform commitments were largely met, albeit some with delays. The 2010 quantitative and structural reform program is appropriately ambitious.