Political Science

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International Monetary Fund. Office of Budget and Planning
Amidst the unfolding COVID-19 crisis, the Fund faces twin challenges. Signs of early crisis recovery are uneven across countries, and many face daunting crisis legacies. At the same time, longer term challenges from climate change, digitalization and increasing divergence within and between countries demand stepped up effort by the Fund within its areas of expertise and in partnership with others. FY 22-24 budget framework. Considering these challenges and following a decade of flat real budgets, staff will propose a structural augmentation for consideration by fall 2021 to be implemented over two to three years beginning in FY 23. Recognizing the importance of ongoing fiscal prudence, the budget would remain stable thereafter on a real basis at a new, higher level. FY 22 administrative budget. The proposed FY 22 budget sustains crisis response and provides incremental resources for long-term priorities within the flat real budget envelope. The budget is built on extensive reprioritization; savings, including from modernization; and a proposed temporary increase in the carry forward ceiling to address crisis needs during the FY 22 to FY 24 period. Capital budget. Large-scale business modernization programs continue to be rolled out, strengthening the agility and efficiency of the Fund’s operations. In response to the shift towards cloud-based IT solutions, staff propose a change in the budgetary treatment of these expenses. Investment in facilities will focus on timely updates, repairs, and modernization, preparing for the post-crisis Fund where virtual engagement and a new hybrid office environment play a larger role. Budget sustainability. The FY 22–24 medium-term budget framework, including assumptions for a material augmentation, is consistent with a projected surplus in the Fund’s medium-term income position and with continued progress towards the precautionary balance target for coming years. Budget risks. In the midst of a global crisis, risks to the budget remain elevated and above risk acceptance levels, including from uncertainty around the level of demand for Fund programs and ensuing staffing needs, as well as future donor funding for CD. Enterprise risk management continues to be strengthened with this budget.
International Monetary Fund
The Joint Staff Advisory Note gives positive feedback on the elaborations made in Burundi’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Report (PRSR-II), and commends the measures taken to eliminate the implementation weaknesses and pitfalls of PRSR-I. The note puts forth guidelines to be followed by the government in implementation of the strategies for achieving the desired results, and emphasizes the need for ensuring a broad social consensus. The Executive Board also emphasizes the need for prioritizing the areas for further development.
International Monetary Fund
Consultations de 2010 au titre de l’article IV—Rapport des services du FMI; supplément des services du FMI; note d’information au public sur les délibérations du Conseil d’administration; et déclaration de l’Administrateur pour le Gabon Chaque rapport, rédigé par une équipe des services du FMI à la suite d'entretiens avec des représentants des autorités, est publié avec l'accord du pays concerné.
International Monetary Fund
Burundi is one of the poorest countries in the world. The country is emerging from more than a decade of civil conflict. The World Bank’s country assistance strategy focuses on structural reforms to further increase growth and reduce poverty. The economy is emerging from the effects of the global crisis. Performance under the Extended Credit Facility-supported (ECF) program has been satisfactory. The discussions focus on the appropriate policy mix to consolidate economic stability and support recovery of the economy. The economy is expected to continue to recover from the effects of the global crisis.
International Monetary Fund
This Joint Staff Advisory Note focuses on the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper–Annual Progress Report (APR) for Burundi. Slow implementation of structural reforms, a sharp decline in coffee production, and the unstable security situation are largely responsible for lower-than-expected economic growth. Poor weather conditions and rising international petroleum and food prices are the main factors behind the faster-than-expected increase in domestic consumer prices. The APR also discusses the issue of regional economic integration, which is one of the elements that will shape medium-term economic developments in Burundi.
International Monetary Fund
This 2008 Article IV Consultation highlights that Burundi is emerging slowly from more than a decade of civil conflict. GDP per capita is about US$139, and only 18 percent of the population is food secure. Economic growth slowed down while inflation increased in 2007. External developments were dominated by a decline in exports and a sharp rise in grants. Executive Directors have commended the authorities for the progress they have made in implementing Burundi’s first Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility-supported program in a difficult post-conflict environment.
International Monetary Fund
Burundi showed commendable performance owing to its prudent macroeconomic policies and ambitious structural reforms under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF). Executive Directors appreciated its macroeconomic stability, strong fiscal discipline, and prudent monetary policies in support of low inflation objectives. They emphasized the need to reduce poverty, sustain macroeconomic stability, and strengthen implementation of structural reforms in reaching the MDGs. They appreciated the efforts taken to deepen implementation of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP), which offers a framework for the diversification of growth and exports, the improvement of public finance management, and the integration of the regional and global economy.
Mr. Robin D Kibuka
The paper reviews the Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRS) approach and efforts to build institutional statistical capacity to permit evidence-based monitoring of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs). Integrating the PRS approach and statistical development strategies could provide significant synergies in improving the monitoring of the PRSP goals. Mainstreaming the statistical strategies in such development plans should enhance the national priority for statistical reforms and provide a basis for costing such reforms for their incorporation into the medium-term expenditure framework. The paper concludes that such an outcome is likely to facilitate funding for the implementation of these reforms and boost the effectiveness of statistical technical assistance.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Fifth Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF) Arrangement for Burundi. Macroeconomic performance under the PRGF-supported program in 2006 was broadly in line with the program. All end-June and end-September 2006 quantitative performance targets were met with the exception of a temporary accumulation of external arrears. Structural reforms lagged in mid-2006. The structural performance criterion at end-September and the structural benchmarks were missed. The measures covered by the performance criterion and three of the benchmarks were implemented by early 2007.
International Monetary Fund
This Joint Staff Advisory Note provides comments and advice on the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP), plans for its implementation, and priorities for strengthening it, including through annual progress reports (APRs) for Burundi. The PRSP highlights that Burundi’s weak institutional capacity must be strengthened if the poverty reduction strategy and growth programs are to succeed. There is particular need for improved public financial management and better implementation of socioeconomic policies and reforms over the medium term.