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International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
This Selected Issues paper examines the implications of lower crude oil prices on Malaysia’s economy. Although Malaysia’s net oil exports are now very small as a share of GDP, its gas exports are sizeable. The paper provides some background on the structure of energy production and trade in Malaysia, and presents results from empirical analysis of the oil prices on Malaysia’s growth. It is concluded that the decline in prices is likely to have a net negative impact on growth, even though the recent decline in oil prices partially reflects supply considerations.
Mr. Benedict J. Clements, Mr. David Coady, Ms. Stefania Fabrizio, Mr. Sanjeev Gupta, Mr. Trevor Serge Coleridge Alleyne, and Mr. Carlo A Sdralevich

Abstract

Los subsidios a la energía tienen consecuencias económicas de amplio alcance. A pesar de que tienen por objeto proteger a los consumidores, los subsidios agravan los desequilibrios fiscales, desplazan gastos públicos prioritarios y deprimen la inversión privada, en particular en el sector de la energía. Los subsidios también distorsionan la asignación de recursos al promover un consumo excesivo de energía, estimular artificialmente industrias que requieren un uso intensivo de capital, reducir los incentivos a la inversión en energías renovables y acelerar el agotamiento de los recursos naturales. Los hogares de mayores ingresos son en definitiva los principales beneficiarios de los subsidios, con lo cual se agudiza la desigualdad. Incluso las generaciones futuras se ven afectadas por los efectos perjudiciales de un aumento del consumo de energía a través del calentamiento global. Este libro ofrece 1) las estimaciones más completas de los subsidios a la energía disponibles en la actualidad con respecto a 176 países y 2) un análisis de cómo realizar la reforma de los subsidios a la energía, a partir de las conclusiones extraídas de 22 estudios de casos realizados por el personal técnico del FMI y de análisis llevados a cabo por otras instituciones.

Mr. Benedict J. Clements, Mr. David Coady, Ms. Stefania Fabrizio, Mr. Sanjeev Gupta, Mr. Trevor Serge Coleridge Alleyne, and Mr. Carlo A Sdralevich

Abstract

Les subventions à l'énergie ont des conséquences économiques très variées. Leur but est de protéger les consommateurs, mais elles exacerbent les déséquilibres budgétaires, évincent les dépenses publiques prioritaires et dépriment l'investissement privé, notamment dans le secteur de l'énergie. Les subventions faussent en outre l'affectation des ressources, car elles encouragent une consommation excessive d'énergie, favorisent artificiellement les industries à forte intensité de capital, réduisent les incitations à investir dans les énergies renouvelables et accélèrent l'épuisement des ressources naturelles. La plupart des avantages liés aux subventions reviennent aux ménages dont le revenu est plus élevé, ce qui accentue les inégalités. Même les générations futures sont touchées, car elles subiront les effets négatifs de l'accroissement de la consommation énergétique sur le réchauffement de la planète. Cet ouvrage offre 1) les estimations les plus exhaustives sur les subventions énergétiques en s’appuyant sur les données recueillies dans 176 pays et 2) une analyse des modalités de réforme des subventions à l'énergie qui s'inspire des conclusions de 22 études de cas nationales menées par le FMI et d'analyses entreprises par d’autres institutions.

Mr. Benedict J. Clements, Mr. David Coady, Ms. Stefania Fabrizio, Mr. Sanjeev Gupta, Mr. Trevor Serge Coleridge Alleyne, and Mr. Carlo A Sdralevich

Abstract

Energy subsidies have wide-ranging economic consequences. Although they are aimed at protecting consumers, subsidies aggravate fiscal imbalances, crowd out priority public spending, and depress private investment, including in the energy sector. Subsidies also distort resource allocation by encouraging excessive energy consumption, artificially promoting capital-intensive industries, reducing incentives for investment in renewable energy, and accelerating the depletion of natural resources. Most subsidy benefits are captured by higher-income households, reinforcing inequality. Even future generations are affected through the damaging effects of increased energy consumption on global warming. This book provides (1) the most comprehensive estimates of energy subsidies currently available for 176 countries and (2) an analysis of “how to do” energy subsidy reform, drawing on insights from 22 country case studies undertaken by the IMF staff and analyses carried out by other institutions.

Mr. Benedict J. Clements, Mr. David Coady, Ms. Stefania Fabrizio, Mr. Sanjeev Gupta, Mr. Trevor Serge Coleridge Alleyne, and Mr. Carlo A Sdralevich

Abstract

Energy subsidies are aimed at protecting consumers, however, subsidies aggravate fiscal imbalances, crowd out priority public spending, and depress private investment, including in the energy sector. This book provides the most comprehensive estimates of energy subsidies currently available for 176 countries and an analysis of “how to do” energy subsidy reform, drawing on insights from 22 country case studies undertaken by the IMF staff and analyses carried out by other institutions.

International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper for the Philippines has been prepared by a staff team of the International Monetary Fund as background documentation for the periodic consultation with the member country. Spillovers have been particularly prominent for countries with financial systems with high foreign bank participation, large exposures to ailing global financial institutions and structured products, and high external liabilities, including through wholesale funding. With a nascent capital market, the economy’s exposure to securitization and off-balance sheet activities is limited. The presence of foreign capital remains low in both the capital market and the banking system.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper for Indonesia reports that following the major cleanup of the banking sector after the crisis, banks’ performance has improved as net interest margins and profitability have increased. Public and external debt ratios have declined and international reserves have risen, reducing domestic and external vulnerabilities. Indonesia stands out as having experienced a slower recovery in investment and exports than other countries hit by the Asian crisis. Recognizing the challenge, the government has adopted a sound medium-term strategy focused on boosting economic growth.
Mr. Kevin Fletcher
Public sector revenue has declined markedly in the Philippines over the past seven years. Most observers of the Philippine economy agree that rebuilding public sector revenue will be critical to reducing deficits and ensuring public sector debt sustainability. This paper reviews several of the main possibilities for raising public sector revenue, including increases in excise, VAT, and electricity rates. It argues that most of these proposals would raise revenue in a relatively efficient manner. Using household-level expenditure data, it also finds that most of these measures would be progressive, especially if they allow the government to avoid cuts in pro-poor spending.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper highlights that the 1980 Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors of the IMF affirmed the willingness of the IMF to evolve, under its charter, to meet new circumstances; but in some ways there was a departure from the past. Two substantive problems dominated the Meeting: the persistence of high inflation as a worldwide problem and the large payments deficits engulfing the non-oil developing countries. There was general agreement that these were the immediate threats to international monetary stability.