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International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
The Sixth Five Year Plan, as outlined in Bangladesh's Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper, targets strategic growth and employment. The medium-term macroeconomic framework plan entails the involvement of both the private and public sectors. Human resources development strategy programs reaching out to the poor and the vulnerable population, as well as environment, climate change, and disaster risk management, have been included in the plan. Managing regional disparities for shared growth and strategy for raising farm productivity and agricultural growth have been outlined. Diversifying exports and developing a dynamic manufacturing sector are all inclusive in the proposed plan.
International Monetary Fund
Nepal is a post-conflict state seeking to formalize democracy in a challenging environment. Significant headway toward a new state has been made since the 2006 peace accord. Progress on a range of technical issues (including public financial management, monetary policy, and financial sector supervision) has also been achieved. However, the failure of the constituent assembly to meet an end-May 2012 deadline to ratify a new constitution is a serious setback, and a major impediment to macroeconomic management and prospects for growth. The subsequent dismissal of the constituent assembly in June 2012 has left day-to-day operations in the hands of a caretaker government. New elections are notionally slated for April 2013, but will require fractured political parties to agree on an interim consensus government. In the meantime, key articles of legislation (such as the government budget) have been delayed. More broadly, the lack of a consensus government and functioning parliament appear to be dampening investment (foreign and domestic), keeping potential donor support at bay, and undermining prospects for sensitive financial sector and state enterprise reforms.
International Monetary Fund
This paper examines Nepal’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper Progress Report. Recurrent expenditures remained high owing to the high military and security expenditures. The expansion of rural credits through rural credit institutions, both in the government and nongovernment sectors, the technical support and social mobilization campaign by different nongovernmental agencies, and poverty reduction programs in the government have helped improve employment opportunities in agriculture, resulting in a better life of the common people.
International Monetary Fund
This note documents slow economic growth and significant delays in reform implementation owing to continued political instability and conflict. The annual progress report (APR) reviews progress in the power sector, but does not mention some critical challenges. It outlines some progress in public sector reforms and private sector development. The APR analyzes the impact on disadvantaged groups of several government of Nepal’s programs, but recognizes a decrease in spending for targeted programs. Progress has been made in finalizing and launching of a framework for monitoring and evaluation.
International Monetary Fund
The achievements in the third year of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper implementation have been satisfactory, given the difficult development environment resulting from the violent conflict and continued political instability. Nepal’s macrolevel indicators remain stable, despite growing pressure on the government budget. Nepal should continue with bolder reforms and development measures. Nepal also needs to begin planning eventual reconstruction and rehabilitation of those affected by the conflict, to be able to quickly respond to the situation when peace is established.
International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This chapter focuses on IMF’s technical assistance (TA) activities and describes Japan Administered Account for Selected Fund Activities (JSA) including its objectives, size, scope, and use, as well as assessments of its activities, with focus on fiscal year. Activities to be funded from the JSA, as well as all other IMF TA activities, are planned each year. Reflecting greater global financial stability and fewer conflict situations over the past two years, FY2006 saw a reduction in JSA allocations for crisis prevention and the rehabilitation of economic and financial institutions in post-conflict countries, and an increase in JSA allocations for sustainable debt management and poverty reduction efforts. The distribution of the commitment of JSA funds among the subject areas has broadly reflected the foregoing distribution in the overall use of IMF resources for technical assistance. Japan also provides financial support for a scholarship program for qualified Asian nationals who want to study economics at the doctoral level at one of the leading universities in North America to pursue a career at the IMF or in their home country governments. The program covers tuition and reasonable costs for two years of study; scholars are expected to cover the remaining years of study, typically through additional funding from their universities.

International Monetary Fund
This progress report presents key findings of the assessment of Nepal’s Tenth Plan—Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP). The report presents an overview of poverty in Nepal, the key elements of the Poverty Reduction Strategy and its linkages with the Millennium Development Goals. It discusses some of the key macroeconomic indicators and achievements. It also sums up government efforts to realign public expenditure management for supporting the PRSP goals. Achievements by sectors are documented. Performance in terms of institutional reforms and governance improvements is also described.
International Monetary Fund
The Joint Staff Assessment on Nepal’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) highlights the PRSP process aimed to provide sustainable macroeconomic framework, improving governance and the overall policy environment. It reviews the execution of the envisaged programs, expenditure planning, public expenditure management system, and the effectiveness of the monitoring system. It also identifies some shortcomings of the PRSP that could be addressed over time and reflected in the annual progress reports to ensure that the strategy is fully effective and operational.
International Monetary Fund
Nepal has a well-established process for preparing periodic development plans, having prepared nine such plans earlier. Typically, the preparation of the new plan starts with the mid-term review of the ongoing plan, which serves as a base for the Approach Paper for the new plan. The Approach Paper, which provides broad guidelines and targets an indicative resource framework for the new plan, is approved by the National Development Council (NDC). The plan is then prepared and finalized after discussion and approval by the National Planning Commission and then by the Cabinet.