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Daniel Gurara, Mr. Vladimir Klyuev, Miss Nkunde Mwase, Mr. Andrea F Presbitero, and Mr. Geoffrey J Bannister
This paper examines trends in infrastructure investment and its financing in low-income developing countries (LIDCs). Following an acceleration of public investment over the last 15 years, the stock of infrastructure assets increased in LIDCs, even though large gaps remain compared to emerging markets. Infrastructure in LIDCs is largely provided by the public sector; private participation is mostly channeled through Public-Private Partnerships. Grants and concessional loans are an essential source of infrastructure funding in LIDCs, while the complementary role of bank lending is still limited to a few countries. Bridging infrastructure gaps would require a broad set of actions to improve the efficiency of public spending, mobilize domestic resources and support from development partners, and crowd in the private sector.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper discusses Benin’s Request for a Three-Year Arrangement under the Extended Credit Facility. The new program aims to create fiscal space by stepping up domestic revenue mobilization and enhancing the efficiency of government spending; gradually increasing absorptive capacity to scale up investment; strengthening public debt management; and promoting private sector investment through stronger institutions and a better business environment while keeping debt sustainable. It will also aim to ensure that scaled-up public investment is consistent with debt sustainability. This is particularly important for Benin: recent borrowing has significantly reduced available fiscal space, and potential risks have materialized as a result of growth shortfalls, fiscal slippages, and contingent liabilities from state-owned enterprises.
International Monetary Fund
This paper is the third in a series assessing macroeconomic developments and prospects in low-income developing countries (LIDCs). The first of these papers (IMF, 2014a) examined trends during 2000–2014, a period of sustained strong growth across most LIDCs. The second paper (IMF, 2015a) focused on the impact of the drop in global commodity prices since mid-2014 on LIDCs—a story with losers (countries dependent on commodity exports, notably fuel) and winners (countries with a more diverse export base, where growth remained robust). The overarching theme in this paper’s assessment of the macroeconomic conjuncture among LIDCs is that of incomplete adjustment to the new world of “lower for long” commodity prices, with many commodity exporters still far from a sustainable macroeconomic trajectory (Chapter 1). The analysis of risks and vulnerabilities focuses on financial sector stresses and medium-term fiscal risks, pointing to the actions, including capacity building, needed to manage and contain these challenges over time (Chapter 2). With 2016 the first year of the march towards the 2030 development goals, the paper also looks at how infrastructure investment can be accelerated in LIDCs, given that weaknesses in public infrastructure (such as energy, transportation systems) in LIDCs are widely seen as a key constraint on medium-term growth potential (Chapter 3). With the sharp adjustment in commodity prices now into its third year, some of the key messages of the paper are familiar: a) many commodity exporters, notably fuel producers, remain under significant economic stress, with sluggish growth, large fiscal imbalances, and weakened foreign reserve positions; b) countries with a more diversified export base are generally doing well, although several have been hit by declines in remittances, conflict/natural disasters, and the contractionary impact of macroeconomic stabilization programs; c) widening fiscal imbalances, in both commodity and diversified exporters, have resulted in rising debt levels, with severe financing stress emerging in some cases; and d) financial sector stresses have emerged in many LIDCs, with expectations that these strains will increase in many commodity exporters over the next 12–18 months. Key messages on financial sector oversight, on medium-term fiscal risks, and on tackling infrastructure gaps are flagged below. Read Executive Summary in: Arabic; Chinese; French; Spanish
International Monetary Fund

Abstract

La croissance économique de l’Afrique subsaharienne devrait rester vigoureuse, grâce à l’investissement dans les infrastructures et à une abondante production agricole. En Guinée, au Libéria et en Sierra Leone, l’épidémie de fièvre Ébola a de lourdes conséquences, avec des répercussions dans les pays adjacents. Les risques externes pesant sur les perspectives globalement positives pour la région ont trait aux conditions financières mondiales et à un ralentissement de la croissance des pays émergents.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Growth in much of Sub-Saharan Africa is expected to remain strong, driven by efforts to invest in infrastructure and strong agricultural production. The current Ebola outbreak in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone is exacting a heavy toll, with spillovers to neighboring countries. External threats to the region's overall positive outlook include global financial conditions and a slowdown in emerging market growth.

International Monetary Fund
Benin’s program furthers the objectives elaborated in the previous report. It is the result of a broad participative process that engaged all levels of government, the private sector, civil society, and donor partners. Executive Directors commend the program as it provides an adequate framework for poverty reduction. The strategy addresses the critical constraints and challenges facing Benin and builds on its comparative advantages. However, it lacks the specificity required to ensure results. Improving alignment of necessary actions and activities in support of the objectives with realistically available resources will help.
International Monetary Fund
Depuis plusieurs années, le FMI publie un nombre croissant de rapports et autres documents couvrant l'évolution et les tendances économiques et financières dans les pays membres. Chaque rapport, rédigé par une équipe des services du FMI à la suite d'entretiens avec des représentants des autorités, est publié avec l'accord du pays concerné.
International Monetary Fund
Depuis plusieurs années, le FMI publie un nombre croissant de rapports et autres documents couvrant l'évolution et les tendances économiques et financières dans les pays membres. Chaque rapport, rédigé par une équipe des services du FMI à la suite d'entretiens avec des représentants des autorités, est publié avec l'accord du pays concerné.
International Monetary Fund
This abstract discusses Benin’s poverty reduction strategy (PRS1). The PRS1 serves as both a strategic frame of reference and a framework for dialogue with technical and financial partners (TFPs). The six major phases involved in the preparation of the growth and poverty reduction strategy (GPRS) and design of the macroeconomic and budgetary framework have been explained in this paper. The impact of macroeconomic and budgetary framework on the attainment of the MDGs and on the poverty reduction is also reviewed.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses the progress report on the National Economic Empowerment and Development Strategy (NEEDS) for Nigeria. The NEEDS 2004–07 is Nigeria’s reform based medium-term plan for economic recovery, growth, and development. Fiscal and monetary policies have been carefully managed in the implementation of NEEDS. A major budget reform introduced under NEEDS was the Oil Price Based Fiscal Rule and Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MFEF), which has enhanced macroeconomic stability by delinking government expenditure from the price of oil.