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International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
Namibia has been severely hit by the COVID-19 pandemic but has started to gradually recover. After a sharp contraction in 2020, with worsening fiscal imbalances and socio-economic disparities, a modest recovery began in 2021 and strengthened in the first half of 2022. Mining activity rebounded while manufacturing and tertiary sector activities gradually started to recover. Inflationary pressures have increased, as higher international oil and food prices due to Russia’s war in Ukraine were passed-through. The political context remains stable, with elections scheduled in 2024.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

1. The COVID-19 pandemic severely hit Namibia, but conditions have recently eased. Following the outbreak in early 2020, a national state of emergency was declared, borders were closed, and a country-wide lockdown introduced. Stringent containment measures were adopted, including restrictions to the movement of people, reduced operation of economic activities, and closure of schools. Severe second and third waves hit Namibia in late 2020 and mid-2021. In December 2021, the rapid spread of the omicron variant lead to a surge in new cases, with a travel ban imposed on Namibia by several countries.1 As the fourth wave eased, most COVID-19 restrictions were lifted in mid-March 2022. In parallel, mobility and international flights arrivals increased. Overall, about 7 percent of the population was infected but the fatality rate was very contained. New reported cases have been limited. About 24 percent of the targeted population is fully vaccinated.2