Africa > Malawi

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International Monetary Fund
The objective for net foreign assets was discussed in this paper. Macroeconomic performance under the PRGF arrangement was broadly discussed. Several developments during the second half of 2005/2006 required the authorities to strengthen financial management controls and to make other policy adjustments. To meet additional humanitarian needs, the government expanded its food security operations. The authorities are working with IMF staff and other stakeholders to redefine pro-poor spending for 2006/2007. The government has taken further steps to ensure the viability of the pension system.
International Monetary Fund
This 2004 Article IV Consultation highlights that Malawi's real GDP grew by an annual average of 3 percent in 2002–03. Agricultural production rebounded from the drought in 2001, but the 2004 harvest was affected by a drought. Macroeconomic imbalances, high interest rates, and infrastructure constraints have adversely affected the non-agricultural economy. Malawi’s performance under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF) arrangement, approved in December 2000, was disappointing. The authorities have requested IMF staff to monitor their economic program to establish a track record that could lead to a new PRGF arrangement.
International Monetary Fund
This paper assesses Malawi’s Use of IMF Resources and Request for Emergency Assistance. The food shortage in early 2002 in Malawi has caused immense human suffering. IMF staff endorses the authorities’ decision to undertake large-scale food imports to complement the humanitarian aid efforts. Moreover, as effective targeting mechanisms are not available, the IMF staff supports the provision of a price subsidy as the most efficient way of reaching the poor who do not benefit from humanitarian aid.
International Monetary Fund
This paper assesses Malawi’s 2002 Article IV Consultation and Economic Program for 2002. Malawi’s economic program was guided by the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) process. The program has been designed in close collaboration with the World Bank and other members of the international community. Malawi’s core economic databases are weak, and the authorities will have to address serious deficiencies more forcefully. Growth performance was disappointing in 2001, with real output likely to have contracted. For 2002, preliminary agricultural production data point at best to a weak economic recovery.