Middle East and Central Asia > Mauritania, Islamic Republic of

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International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews economic developments in Mauritania during 1996–99. Mauritania continued its ambitious program of economic reforms in 1995–97. The government exercised firm control over public expenditures and ran a fiscal surplus in both 1996 and 1997. The decline in broad money in 1995–96 was reversed in 1997, reflecting increased confidence in ouguiya-denominated assets, in part owing to the implementation of financial market reforms. These policies and reforms resulted in sustained GDP growth, which averaged 4.6 percent annually over 1995–97, that is, 1.8 percent in real per capita income growth.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund
This paper describes economic developments in Mauritania during the 1990s. Significant progress has been achieved in Mauritania since 1992. Economic growth has held up and the rate of inflation has been contained to below 5 percent. The lingering domestic banking crisis was confronted through a comprehensive bank reform. Firm control has been exercised over fiscal and monetary policies, and remedial measures were introduced to cope with unforeseen fiscal outlays for bank restructuring and to counter the impact of a more adverse export environment.