Law > Business and Financial

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 43 items for :

  • Type: Journal Issue x
  • International Lending and Debt Problems x
Clear All Modify Search
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
The COVID-19 pandemic severely impacted Nepal’s economy. Tourist arrivals collapsed, domestic activity plummeted, and remittances have been volatile. As a result, balance of payments and fiscal financing gaps emerged. After growth was lower than expected in 2019/20, a gradual resumption in economic activity and a corresponding surge in imports and related tax receipts led to higher growth and improved fiscal outturns in 2020/21. However, important fiscal and external financing needs remain to support the COVID-19 response, facilitate a continued recovery, and maintain a comfortable level of reserves.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
The 2016–20 ECF/EFF helped rehabilitate Moldova’s banking sector, bolstering macro-financial stability. However, the COVID-19 pandemic, drought in 2020, and the ongoing surge in global energy prices, have slowed economic activity, intensified downside risks, and complicated policy making. While emergency financial assistance under a blended RCF/RFI (100 percent of quota) and SDR allocation (US$236 million) helped cushion the pandemic’s impact, Moldova remains among the poorest countries in Europe with long-standing governance and structural weaknesses inhibiting income convergence.
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
Swift implementation of containment measures, limited spillovers from tourism, and COVID-related fiscal spending financed by buoyant fishing revenues and donor grants have allowed Tuvalu—a fragile Pacific micro-state—avoid a recession in 2020. The economy is expected to expand by 2.5 percent in 2021, supported by fiscal expenditures and resumption of infrastructure projects. But significant challenges remain: Tuvalu is vulnerable to the effects of climate change, its economy is dominated by the public sector, and its revenue base is narrow. Uncertainty around donor commitments complicates fiscal planning.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This paper discusses Morocco’s First Review Under the Arrangement Under the Precautionary and Liquidity Line (PLL). The Moroccan authorities are committed to sustaining sound policies. The government’s economic program remains in line with key reforms agreed under the PLL arrangement, including to further reduce fiscal and external vulnerabilities, while strengthening the foundations for higher and more inclusive growth. The transition to greater exchange rate flexibility initiated in 2018 is expected to enhance the economy’s capacity to absorb shocks and preserve its external competitiveness. The current favorable economic environment remains supportive to continue this reform in a carefully sequenced and well-communicated manner. The report recommends that continued reforms are needed to raise potential growth and reduce high unemployment levels, especially among the youth, increase female labor participation, and reduce regional disparities. Reforms of education, governance, the labor market, and the business environment would help support more private sector-led growth and job creation.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper discusses Grenada’s Sixth Review under the Extended Credit Facility (ECF) Arrangement and Financing Assurances Review. The government met all continuous and end-December 2016 performance criteria and structural benchmarks. The economy grew by about 3.9 percent in 2016, reflecting continued strong construction activity and steady external demand for Grenada’s tourism services. The pace of restructuring of public debt has accelerated in recent months, and Grenada’s debt-to-GDP ratio declined to 83.4 percent at the end of 2016 from 108 percent in 2013. The IMF staff supports the completion of the Sixth Review under the ECF arrangement and the financing assurances review.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This paper assesses the level of implementation of the International Organization of Securities Commissions objectives and principles of securities regulation in the Russian Federation. The findings reveal that there is much that the Central Bank of Russia needs to accomplish if it is to approach good international practice as a securities regulator. Some of the most recent regulatory changes, such as those on credit rating agencies, are clearly based on international standards. In other areas, further initiatives will be required. These include identification of conflict of interest and improving management standards of professional market participants.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper presents an assessment of the level of implementation of the IOSCO (International Organization of Securities Commissions) objectives and principles in the Russian Federation. Some of the most recent regulatory changes in the Russian Federation are clearly based on international standards. In other areas, further initiatives will be required. These include conflicts of interest identification and improving standards of management in professional market participants. It will also require the creation of legal gateways which will enable supervisors with the necessary skills sets to provide guidance as to what the Central Bank of the Russian Federation’s (CBR) reasonable expectations are on a range of issues. CBR also faces a major challenge in enforcing the regulatory regime and will need additional resources.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This paper reviews Morocco's economic performance under a program supported by a two-year Precautionary and Liquidity Line (PLL) arrangement. Macroeconomic conditions of Morocco have continued to improve, but challenges remain same. Continued reform implementation will be essential to strengthen macroeconomic buffers and promote higher and more inclusive growth. Sustained implementation of structural reforms will be critical to boost potential growth in the medium term. The authorities intend to continue to treat the current arrangement as precautionary, and are still assessing possible options regarding Morocco's exit strategy and the potential need for a successor arrangement. Overall, Morocco continues to meet the qualification criteria for a PLL arrangement.