Europe > Cayman Islands

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International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper takes stock of St. Lucia’s plans to manage climate change, from the perspective of their macroeconomic implications, and suggests macro-relevant reforms that could strengthen the likelihood of success of the national strategy. To meet its renewable energy plans, St. Lucia will need to mobilize private investment. External assistance will be needed to develop supporting infrastructure. Building capacity for project assessment and investment promotion is a high priority, to shape needed investments into bankable projects. Elsewhere, capacity-building would be most useful to help cost sectoral plans, complete the disaster-preparedness strategy, move toward carbon taxation, and strengthen skills in public investment management and public financial management.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This Financial Sector Assessment Program report on People’s Republic of China–Hong Kong Special Administrative Region highlights that it has developed a sound framework for the regulation of securities markets, which exhibits a high level of implementation of the International Organization of Securities Commissions Principles. Both the Securities and Futures Commission (SFC) and the Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) are sophisticated regulators and have been able to leverage from domestic and international expertise to develop sound supervisory practices. Further, while traumatic, the Lehman minibond experience has led to material improvements in conduct supervision that have permeated both the SFC and the HKMA. Continuing efforts by the SFC to build up its capacity to identify and monitor emerging risks should increase the SFC’s ability to react in a timely manner to an evolving landscape, marked by an increased interconnection with the Mainland China, an active presence by international players and increased regional competition as an international finance center. It is important to consider translating the operational independence that the regulators have enjoyed into de-jure independence, through modifications in the current legal governance arrangements for both SFC and HKMA.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper is a detailed assessment of Indonesia’s financial sector—assessment of compliance with the Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision (BCP) carried out within the framework of the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP). The Indonesian financial sector comprises banks, multi-finance companies, capital market companies, insurance companies, and pension funds. Bank Indonesia (BI), the central bank, is responsible for regulation and supervision of the banking system. The Executive Board recommends effective information exchange arrangements with other financial sector supervisors, and also to bring about amendments to the BI Act.
International Monetary Fund
In this study, the economic developments and policy responses of Trinidad and Tobago after the crisis is reviewed. Policy recommendations are used to strengthen the legal and regulatory framework. According to the IMF’s financial system stability assessment (FSSA), there were critical gaps in the overall legal, regulatory, and supervisory structure for the insurance sector. The quality of insurance sector supervision can be assessed against internationally accepted established “core principles.” In this paper, an overview is presented of why the crisis occurred and some suggestions on how to prevent a future crisis.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues Paper of the United States analyses the Report on Standards and Codes (ROSC) and the Detailed Assessment Report (DAR) on the current state of the U.S. implementation of the Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision. The assessment identifies key weaknesses in the regulatory and supervisory framework, and mentions recommendations to improve the compliance measures. The report also summarizes assessment of the U.S. securities and futures market regulatory system. Greater focus on systemic issues relating to both securities and futures markets are recommended to make the overall regulatory system more robust.
International Monetary Fund
This paper focuses on observance of standards and codes on the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) recommendations for antimoney laundering and combating the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) for the Cayman Islands. The assessment reveals that the Cayman Islands’s legal framework for combating money laundering and terrorism financing is comprehensive. All designated categories of offences enumerated in the FATF 40 Recommendations are predicate offences under the Cayman law. The criminalization of FT is in accordance with FATF requirements. The confiscation regime meets most standards and is effective.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses findings of the assessment of Financial Sector Supervision and Regulation on the Cayman Islands. The assessment reveals that substantial progress has been made in the implementation of the 2003 Offshore Financial Center assessment recommendations, including, importantly, regarding Cayman Islands Monetary Authority’s independence and resources. There is scope for enhancing regulatory reporting and disclosure requirements by financial entities, such as shortening the period for filing required documents and requiring all insurers to disclose their use of derivatives and similar commitments regularly.
International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews key findings of the detailed assessment of the Observance of Standards and Codes in the Financial Sector of the Cayman Islands. Banks in the Cayman Islands operate within a well-defined prudential regulatory framework, generally in accordance with Basel standards, that is, largely modeled after the framework currently in use in the United Kingdom. The two-tiered required minimum risk capital standards are significantly above those required by the Basel Capital Accord and are applied in practice based primarily on the perceived differences in risk related to bank ownership.
International Monetary Fund
This paper highlights key findings of the assessment of financial sector regulation and supervision in the Cayman Islands. The assessment reveals that in the last two years, an extensive program of legislative, rule, and guideline development in the Cayman Islands has introduced an increasingly effective system of regulation, both formalizing earlier practices and introducing enhanced procedures. The implementation of financial regulation and supervision complies broadly with standards in all the areas assessed. However, issues related to resources and potential breaches of operational autonomy affect the regulator and, hence, supervision in all sectors.
International Monetary Fund
This review of financial sector regulation and supervision in the Kingdom of the Netherlands—Netherlands Antilles explains banking, insurance, and pension fund supervision. The Netherlands Antilles is resolved to remove the perception created by placement of the jurisdiction in the weakest category of the list of offshore financial centers, published by the Financial Stability Forum (FSF). Bank of the Netherlands Antilles (BNA) staff is highly capable, well-trained, and dedicated, and is able to attract appropriate personnel and material resources to perform its functions.