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Mrs. Sarwat Jahan, Jayendu De, Mr. Fazurin Jamaludin, Piyaporn Sodsriwiboon, and Cormac Sullivan
Financial inclusion is a multidimensional concept and countries have chosen diverse methods of enhancing financial inclusion with varying degrees of results. The heterogeneity of financial inclusion is particularly striking in the Asia-Pacific region as member countries range from those that are at the cutting edge of financial technology to others that are aiming to provide access to basic financial services. The wide disparity is not only inter-country but also intra-country. The focus of this paper is to take stock of the current state of financial inclusion in the Asia-Pacific region by highlighting twelve stylized facts about the state of financial inclusion in these countries. The paper finds that the state of financial inclusion depends on several factors, but a holistic approach calibrated to specific country conditions may lead to greater financial inclusion.
Mr. Geoffrey J Bannister, Mr. Jarkko Turunen, and Malin Gardberg
Despite significant strides in financial development over the past decades, financial dollarization, as reflected in elevated shares of foreign currency deposits and credit in the banking system, remains common in developing economies. We study the impact of financial dollarization, differentiating across foreign currency deposits and credit on financial depth, access and efficiency for a large sample of emerging market and developing countries over the past two decades. Panel regressions estimated using system GMM show that deposit dollarization has a negative impact on financial deepening on average. This negative impact is dampened in cases with past periods of high inflation. There is also some evidence that dollarization hampers financial efficiency. The results suggest that policy efforts to reduce dollarization can spur faster and safer financial development.
International Monetary Fund
This note provides guidance to staff on the conduct of surveillance in the context of Article IV consultations, a core activity of the Fund. Surveillance involves the continuous monitoring of members‘ economic and financial policies and their impact on their own and global stability. During Article IV consultations, staff holds pointed discussions with country authorities on the economic situation, the authorities‘ policies and how these affect the country‘s stability, the role of potential or actual spillovers where relevant, and desirable policy adjustments. These discussions are then reported to the Fund‘s Executive Board for its consideration. The goal, through thorough analysis, candid discussions, and a peer-review mechanism, is to promote the stability of members‘ economies, as well as the effective operation of the international monetary system, including through maintaining global stability.
International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper discusses Fiscal Year 2003 Annual Report for Japan Administered Account for Selected IMF Activities (JSA). The report consists of a brief description of the IMF and its activities, with a particular focus on its technical assistance activities. It provides greater detail with regard to the JSA and the scholarship programs. It also describes the objectives, size and scope, and use with a focus on fiscal year 2003. The report highlights that in FY2003, JSA financing accounted for 18 percent of total IMF technical assistance, 33 percent of the assistance delivered in the field, and 66 percent of the total external financing.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

An introductory guide to the IMF’s technical assistance. Providing technical assistance to member countries-particularly developing countries and countries in transition-is at the core of the IMF’s mission. Technical assistance, which includes training for government and central banks officials, is one of the benefits of IMFmembership. It complements and enhances the IMF's other key forms of assistance, i.e., surveillance and lending. The IMF provides technical assistance mainly in its areas of expertise and responsibility: fiscal policy, monetary policy, and macroeconomic and financial statistics.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The speeches made by officials attending the IMF–World Bank Annual Meetings are published in this volume, along with the press communiqués issued by the International Monetary and Financial Committee and the Development Committee at the conclusion of the meetings.