Middle East and Central Asia > Iran, Islamic Republic of

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International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This 2018 Article IV Consultation highlights that the real GDP growth of Iran is expected to reach 4.3 percent in 2017/18. In the first half of 2017/18, recovery broadened to the non-oil sector, aided by supportive fiscal and monetary policies and a recovery in construction and services activity. The unemployment rate declined to 11.7 percent in the first half of 2017/18, but remained particularly high for youth and women. Inflation averaged 9.9 percent during the first 11 months of 2017/18 aided by moderation in food prices and stable administered prices. Real GDP growth is expected to ease to 4 percent in 2018/19 and is forecast to average 4.5 percent over the medium-term.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This Selected Issues paper analyzes impediments to correspondent banking with the Islamic Republic of Iran. Even though international nuclear sanctions were lifted January 16, 2016, Iranian banks face protracted difficulties in reentering the international financial system through correspondent relationships with global banks. Significant challenges continue to prevent Iranian banks from fully reconnecting with global banks. These challenges relate mostly to remaining sanctions from the United States; the regulatory enforcement environment; and significant deficiencies in Iran’s Anti–Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism framework, including Iranian companies’ lack of transparency. Domestic policy reforms can potentially facilitate reconnection to non-US global banks.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
This 2016 Article IV Consultation highlights a rebound in economic growth in the Islamic Republic of Iran over the course of 2016–17 based on higher oil production. Real GDP grew 7.4 percent in the first half of 2016–17, rebounding from the 2015–16 recession. However, growth in the non-oil sector averaged 0.9 percent, despite having picked up in the second quarter, reflecting continued difficulties in access to financing and domestic financial sector and structural weaknesses. Growth is projected to stabilize at 4.5 percent over the medium term as the recovery broadens. The current account is forecast to remain in surplus as higher exports offset the pickup in imports related to investment.
International Monetary Fund. Legal Dept.
This report provides a summary of the anti-money laundering and combating the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) measures in place in Italy as at the date of the onsite visit. It analyzes the level of compliance with the Financial Action Task Force recommendations and the level of effectiveness of Italy's AML/CFT system, and provides recommendations on how the system could be strengthened. Italy has a mature and sophisticated AML/CFT regime, with a correspondingly well-developed legal and institutional framework. Law enforcement agencies access, use, and develop good quality financial intelligence. Financial sector supervisors have been using a risk-based approach to varying degrees, but their supervisory tools could be improved.
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
The postcrisis recovery in Armenia has accelerated, but challenges remain. Economic policies have been broadly consistent with IMF advice. Credit growth has been strong, especially in foreign currency (FX). The banking system is sound. The central bank (CBA) is improving the regulatory and supervisory framework in line with Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) recommendations. Risks are mainly on the downside and come from potential external shocks, political uncertainties, and regional conflicts. Strong adjustment is continuing in 2012 with the deficit again expected to be lower than budgeted.
International Monetary Fund
Afghanistan is one of the poorest countries in the world and, after decades of ongoing conflicts and strife, it is still at an early stage of developing its legal and institutional framework. Measures have been taken to fight crime, including financial crime. Smuggling and fraud are other major sources of illegal funds. In addition, terrorism and its financing remain a major concern. A framework has been established to allow for international mutual legal assistance but it falls short of the standard and is rarely used.
International Monetary Fund
In this study, the general situation of money laundering and financing of terrorism is discussed. In addition, the followings are overviewed: financial sector, DNFBP sector, commercial laws and mechanisms governing legal persons, and strategy to prevent money laundering and terrorist financing. A legal framework and criminalization of financing of terrorism are also given. Confiscation, freezing, and seizing are explained under the legal framework. Various preventive measures used are also discussed in this paper. Financial institution secrecy and confidentiality are also outlined.
International Monetary Fund
This detailed assessment report focuses on antimoney laundering and combating the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) for Armenia. The report reveals that Armenia’s financial system remains small and bank dominated. Total assets of the banking sector accounted for approximately 91 percent of the assets in the financial system. Most banks are domestically owned but there is a major foreign presence in the system. The nonbank financial sector plays a small role in financial intermediation.
International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.
IMF research summaries on governance of banks (by Luc Laeven) and on whether there is a foreign aid paradox (by Thierry Tressel); country study on Mozambique (by Jean A.P. Clément and Shanaka J. Peiris); listing of visiting scholars at the IMF during July 2007-January 2008; listing of contents of Vol. 54, Issue No. 4 of IMF Staff Papers; listing of recent IMF Working Papers; listing of recent external publications by IMF staff; and a call for papers for the upcoming Conference on International Finance.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper provides a preliminary view on Afghanistan’s external competitiveness through a review of some macroeconomic, microeconomic, and institutional indicators. It discusses the rebuilding of domestic revenue, and analyzes the macroeconomic impact of the drug economy and the counternarcotics efforts. The paper provides, whenever available, statistical information on the real, fiscal, monetary, and external sectors. It also contains a list of state-owned enterprises and an updated summary of the tax system as of end-December 2005.