Africa > Gambia, The

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • Type: Journal Issue x
  • Trade: General x
  • International trade x
Clear All Modify Search
Eugen Tereanu
This paper applies intertemporal models of precautionary saving to compute an optimal level of international reserves for The Gambia. The analysis focuses on current account shocks specific to a low-income economy with a significant import component and complements a more standard, rule-of-thumb reserve adequacy assessment. The results suggest a central range from 4.5 months to 7 months of imports, which is broadly aligned with the recent actual coverage. Notwithstanding parameter sensitivity, the simulations allow for more informed policy decisions that balance flexibility with a prudent approach to reserve use.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper and Statistical Appendix for The Gambia underlies that the exchange rate is broadly in line with fundamentals, although data weaknesses and uncertainties prevent a definitive assessment. The Gambia’s current account deficit is higher than economic fundamentals would predict, and a depreciation of 11 percent would be needed to restore sustainability. The external sustainability approach suggests that 4–6 percent depreciation is needed for the current account deficit to be consistent with constant net foreign assets as a share of GDP.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews economic developments in The Gambia during 1990–95. Economic activity slowed down in 1993/94 and contracted by at least 4 percent in real terms in 1994/95. With the drop in re-export trade and the disruption of the tourist season, domestic government revenues declined by more than 4 percent of GDP during 1993/94–1994/95; foreign grants fell by an additional 2 percent of GDP, owing to the suspension of balance-of-payments assistance following the military coup.
International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

The speeches made by officials attending the IMF–World Bank Annual Meetings are published in this volume, along with the press communiqués issued by the International Monetary and Financial Committee and the Development Committee at the conclusion of the meetings.