Europe > Denmark

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Type: Journal Issue x
  • Economic growth x
Clear All Modify Search
Sriram Balasubramanian, Lahcen Bounader, Mrs. Jana Bricco, and Dmitry Vasilyev
Is there a one-size-fits-all approach to inclusive growth? We look at four key case studies across advanced and emerging markets—the Nordics, India, Brazil, and Egypt—to try to answer this question. We highlight qualitatively in these countries the key components of inclusive growth models, outcomes from these models, and the road ahead in the respective countries. Some of the analysis focuses on co-operative labor markets in the Nordics, direct benefit transfers in India, the role of social assistance and commodity boom in Brazil, and the inequality puzzle in Egypt. The paper finds that there is a lack of homogeneity among the approaches by these countries and identifies the need for customized solutions to inclusive growth. A one-size-fits-all approach doesn’t seem to work. The more customized the inclusive growth model, the better the overall outcome.
IMF Research Perspective (formerly published as IMF Research Bulletin) is a new, redesigned online newsletter covering updates on IMF research. In the inaugural issue of the newsletter, Hites Ahir interviews Valeria Cerra; and they discuss the economic environment 10 years after the global financial crisis. Research Summaries cover the rise of populism; economic reform; labor and technology; big data; and the relationship between happiness and productivity. Sweta C. Saxena was the guest editor for this inaugural issue.
International Monetary Fund
The staff report for the 2004 Article IV Consultation on Denmark focuses on economic developments and policies. Labor market reforms led to a sustained increase in structural employment, while careful fiscal policy in the context of a clear medium-term sustainability strategy delivered budget surpluses and a steady decline in government debt as a share of GDP. Fiscal policy in Denmark is based on a medium-term strategy to accommodate the pressures from an aging population while maintaining the welfare state without increasing taxes.