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International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
The CBvCSM is the sole supervisory authority for all regulated financial institutions operating locally and in the offshore (or international) sector, as well as the stock exchange in Curacao and St Maarten. The financial sector comprises different types of institutions, which include banks and non-bank institutions, insurance companies (both Life, and Non-life), securities intermediaries, asset management firms, investments institutions, fund administrators, management of pension funds, reinsurers, and trust companies.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This 2019 Article IV Consultation focuses on Curaçao and Sint Maarten’s near and medium-term challenges and policy priorities and was prepared before coronavirus disease 2019 became a global pandemic and resulted in unprecedented strains in global trade, commodity and financial markets. The fiscal position in Curaçao improved in the past two years, in part due to implemented fiscal measures. Both Curaçao and Sint Maarten would benefit from introducing a Fiscal Responsibility Framework. It could incorporate a central government debt ratio as a long-term anchor and operational rules calibrated to meet it. The report suggests that risks in the financial sector need to be addressed as a matter of priority. The authorities should develop a strategy for addressing financial sector vulnerabilities with the objective of preserving financial stability while minimizing fiscal costs. Significant strengthening of supervision and a complete overhaul of the bank resolution framework are also urgently needed. An across-the board improvement in the governance framework should be a key priority in both countries. Vulnerabilities in the financial system point to the need to strengthen governance in the financial sector.
Miss Rita Mesias

Abstract

This Coordinated Direct Investment Survey Guide (Guide) has been prepared to assist economies in participating in the Coordinated Direct Investment Survey (CDIS). The CDIS is being conducted under the auspices of the Statistics Department of the IMF across a wide range of economies. The survey is conducted simultaneously by all participating economies; uses consistent definitions; and encourages best practices in collecting, compiling, and disseminating data on direct investment positions. The CDIS is thus an important tool in capturing world totals and the geographic distribution of direct investment positions, thereby contributing to important new understandings of the extent of globalization, and improving the overall quality of direct investment data worldwide. As of the writing of this updated Guide, more than 100 economies participate in the CDIS.

International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
KEY ISSUES Context: The union’s current account deficit—the key economic vulnerability flagged in the previous (2011) consultation—has declined over the past few years, including thanks to fiscal adjustment in Curaçao. But it remains large. Curaçao’s growth and job creation remain lackluster, due to weak competitiveness, adverse sectoral trends (e.g., in the international financial center), red tape, and rigid labor laws. Sint Maarten’s tourism-based economy is recovering but remains vulnerable to shocks and suffers from weak administrative capacity—as underscored, for example, by weakening tax collection. Risks: Both Curaçao and, especially, Sint Maarten are exposed to shifts in tourism demand. Curaçao is vulnerable to the uncertain situation in Venezuela, its main trading partner. If long-discussed flexibility- and competitiveness-enhancing structural reforms are not implemented, both countries’ capacity to absorb shocks may prove limited, and pressures on FX reserves and, ultimately, the peg may intensify. Policy recommendations: Fiscal policies should entrench recent gains to facilitate continued external adjustment (especially in Curaçao) and build buffers against shocks. Curaçao should extend the reform of its pension system to public sector workers, further streamline its administrative apparatus, and address weak governance and finances in state companies. Sint Maarten needs to increase revenues to support an expanding administration, including through stronger tax collection and greater contribution from its profitable state companies. The common central bank must monitor closely the deterioration in banks’ loan portfolios and refrain from direct financing of non-financial companies. It should also use more standard sterilization tools to control banks’ excess liquidity. Urgent action is required to lower the cost of doing business and remove pervasive disincentives to both supply and demand of labor.
International Monetary Fund
The 2008 Article IV Consultation analyzes the promise of fiscal discipline and debt relief that has boosted investor confidence and growth in the Kingdom of the Netherlands—Netherlands Antilles. Although exports moderated temporarily, tourism was a bright spot owing to improvements in competitiveness as a result of infrastructure investments, and cost controls from immigration. Executive Directors encouraged the authorities to take the opportunity provided by the large debt relief from the Netherlands government under the dissolution agreement to set the budget and the economy on a more sustainable footing.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper for the Kingdom of the Netherlands reports the Antillean economy lacks natural resources and is open and undiversified, relying mainly on exports of services such as tourism, international financial services, shipping, and oil refining. Exports and domestic consumer spending, both private and public, drove the economic recovery. Economic growth in the United States and the appreciation of the euro against the national currency contributed to the strong performance in the tourism sector.
International Monetary Fund
The paper provides a brief review of economic developments and policies in the Netherlands Antilles. The government’s current adjustment initiative provides a much needed opportunity for restoring growth prospects for the Netherlands Antilles. The paper has looked into issues pertaining to the development and prospects of the Antillean offshore sector. The picture emerging is one of a sector that, after initial spectacular growth, has encountered a number of obstacles. Nevertheless, it has been able to continue to register positive, albeit more moderate, growth.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper and Statistical Appendix explores four policy issues—fiscal policy, public sector pension reforms, monetary management, and labor market performance—which are crucial for understanding the recent performance of the economy of the Netherlands Antilles and which will need to be addressed to restore the prospect of durable economic growth. The paper reviews experience with fiscal adjustment in the Netherlands Antilles, focusing in particular on the 1996–97 adjustment program. The paper also analyzes the sustainability of the public pension system of the country.
Mrs. Anne C Jansen, Mr. Donald J Mathieson, Mr. Barry J. Eichengreen, Ms. Laura E. Kodres, Mr. Bankim Chadha, and Mr. Sunil Sharma

Abstract

Hedge funds are collective investment vehicles, often organized as private partnerships and resident offshore for tax and regulatory purposes. Their legal status places few restrictions on their portfolios and transactions, leaving their managers free to use short sales, derivative securities, and leverage to raise returns and cushion risk. This paper considers the role of hedge funds in financial market dynamics, with particular reference to the Asian crisis.

International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews economic developments in the Netherlands Antilles during 1990–96. The economic situation started deteriorating significantly since the early 1990s. Economic growth slackened, mainly reflecting weak investment and a sharp drop in tourist arrivals in 1995–96 owing to hurricane damage. The underlying external position deteriorated progressively, and reserves fell to an uncomfortably low level. The major factors behind the deterioration were occasional slippages in monetary policy and persistently large fiscal deficits that had their roots in a rapid growth of personnel costs.