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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The Annual Report 2005 to the Board of Governors reviews the IMF's activities and policies during the financial year (May 1, 2004, through April 30, 2005). The main sections cover country, global, and regional surveillance; strengthening surveillance and crisis prevention; IMF program support and crisis resolution; the Fund's role in low-income countries; financial operations and policies; technical assistance and training; governance and management of the IMF; and cooperation, communication and outreach. Besides the full financial statements for the year, appendixes cover international reserves, financial operations and transactions, principal policy decisions, relations with other international organizations, press communiqués of advisory committees, Executive Directors and their voting power, and changes in the Executive Board's membership.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper reviews key findings of the IMF’s Annual Report for the fiscal year ended April 30, 1954. The report highlights that downward trend in the volume of world trade that had appeared early in 1952 was reversed in 1953, and in the last three quarters of that year, the rate of both the volume and the value of world trade exceeded that of 1952. The pattern of recovery, moreover, was such that it eased substantially the balance-of-payments disequilibrium.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper reviews key findings of the IMF’s Annual Report for the fiscal year ended April 1948. The report highlights that during 1947 and in the early part of 1948, considerable progress was made in strengthening the economies that suffered devastation and dislocation as a result of the war. Over the world, generally production rose and recovery continued, despite widespread political tension and conflict, and disturbances. In nearly all countries, however, the need and demand for goods continued to be abnormally great, and there were increasing difficulties in meeting international payments for import surpluses.