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International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
Since the approval of the first RFI request on April 9, 2020 (IMF Country Report No 20/109), weaker external demand and a more pronounced impact of containment measures have further deteriorated growth prospects and worsened external and fiscal positions. The authorities are requesting a purchase under the Rapid Financing Instrument (RFI) of 50 percent of quota (SDR 108 million) to be used as budget support to help address urgent balance of payment (BoP) needs and mitigate the risk of disorderly fiscal or BoP adjustment. This additional request will bring the total purchases under the RFI to 100 percent of quota in 2020.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
Since the approval of the first RFI request on April 9, 2020 (IMF Country Report No 20/109), weaker external demand and a more pronounced impact of containment measures have further deteriorated growth prospects and worsened external and fiscal positions. The authorities are requesting a purchase under the Rapid Financing Instrument (RFI) of 50 percent of quota (SDR 108 million) to be used as budget support to help address urgent balance of payment (BoP) needs and mitigate the risk of disorderly fiscal or BoP adjustment. This additional request will bring the total purchases under the RFI to 100 percent of quota in 2020.
Mr. Mauricio Vargas and Daniela Hess
Using data from 1980-2017, this paper estimates a Global VAR (GVAR) model taylored for the Caribbean region which includes its major trading partners, representing altogether around 60 percent of the global economy. We provide stilyzed facts of the main interrelations between the Caribbean region and the rest of the world, and then we quantify the impact of external shocks on Caribbean countries through the application of two case studies: i) a change in the international price of oil, and ii) an increase in the U.S. GDP. We confirmed that Caribbean countries are highly exposed to external factors, and that a fall in oil prices and an increase in the U.S. GDP have a positive and large impact on most of them after controlling for financial variables, exchange rate fluctuations and overall price changes. The results from the model help to disentangle effects from various channels that interact at the same time, such as flows of tourists, trade of goods, and changes in economic conditions in the largest economies of the globe.
Ms. Olga Ilinichna Stankova
The paper provides an overall view of communications across various areas of economic policy, aiming to help country authorities as they increasingly use communications as a policy tool in its own right. The paper identifies frontier communications challenges, drawing on a large body of research on the salient issues. Although communications can never be a substitute for good policies, economic reforms are more likely to fail or even be reversed if they are not understood or accepted by those whom they affect.
International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
This paper discusses the role of, and provides practical country-level guidance on, fiscal policies for implementing climate strategies using a unique and transparent tool laying out trade-offs among policy options.
Ian W.H. Parry, Mr. Dirk Heine, Kelley Kizzier, and Tristan Smith
The International Maritime Organization (IMO) announced in April 2018 a target of cutting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the sector by 50 percent below 2008 levels by 2050 and subsequent meetings of the IMO will develop a strategy for making headway on this commitment. This paper seeks to inform dialogue about the possibility of a carbon tax as a key element of GHG mitigation policy for international maritime transport. The paper discusses the case for the tax over alternative mitigation instruments, options for the practical design issues, and then presents estimates of the impacts of carbon taxation and other instruments from an analytical model of the maritime sector.
Ian W.H. Parry and Victor Mylonas
The pan-Canadian approach to carbon pricing, announced in October 2016, ensures that carbon pricing applies throughout Canada in 2018, with increasing stringency over time to reduce emissions. Canadian provinces and territories have the flexibility to either implement an explicit price-based system—with a minimum price of CAN $10 per tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2018, increasing to CAN $50 per tonne by 2022—or an equivalently scaled emissions trading system. This paper discusses the rationale for, and design of, the price floor requirement; its (provincial-level) environmental, fiscal, and economic welfare impacts; monitoring issues; and (national-level) incidence. The general conclusion is that the welfare costs and implementation issues are manageable, and pricing provides significant new revenues. A challenge is that the floor price by itself appears well short of what will be needed by 2030 for Canada’s Paris Agreement pledge.