Business and Economics > Natural Resource Extraction

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International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
Real growth is expected at 5.8 percent in 2020, supported by rebounding mining production and investment-led construction activity. Legislative elections and a referendum for a new constitution will be held in March and presidential elections by end-year. Protests against the referendum are ongoing. Risks of political and social instability are high. Covid-19. The baseline scenario is based on the initial global downward revisions to growth due to the COVID-19 outbreak and assumes no outbreak in Guinea. As of March 10, 2020, there was no declared coronavirus case in Guinea. As the situation evolves, the country authorities and staff are keeping a close watch on macroeconomic developments, needed policy responses, and their impact on financing needs.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper focuses on Guinea’s Fourth Review Under the Extended Credit Facility (ECF) Arrangement, and Financing Assurances Review. While performance under the IMF-supported program remains broadly satisfactory, Guinea faces significant downside risks related to coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. The IMF will remain closely engaged with the Guinean country authorities as the situation evolves, and as the authorities further develop their policy responses and financing needs change. The ECF arrangement supports strengthening Guinea’s resilience, scaling-up growth-supporting investment and social-safety nets and promoting private sector development. Achieving the programmed basic fiscal surplus in 2020 will contribute to containing inflation and preserving debt sustainability. Mobilizing additional tax revenues and reducing electricity subsidies will create fiscal space to scale-up growth-supporting public investments and strengthen social safety nets. Implementing programmed tax revenues measures, adopting an automatic petroleum products price adjustment mechanism, and advancing the multi-year electricity tariff reform is key. A prudent borrowing strategy will support scaling-up growth-supporting public investment.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper discusses Niger’s Eighth Review Under the Extended Credit Facility (ECF) Arrangement and Request for Waivers of Nonobservance of Performance Criteria (PC) and for Modification of PCs. Niger’s medium-term prospects are closely linked to returns on major projects in oil and mineral extraction that are under way. Two of the end-2015 PC for the eighth ECF review were missed (on domestic financing and domestic arrears repayment), as were several indicative targets. The IMF staff supports the authorities’ request for waivers for the unmet PC on domestic financing and domestic arrears repayments at end-December 2015.
International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
This Technical Assistance report reviews South Africa’s tax system and also examines the fiscal regime with a view to generating a sustainable revenue contribution from mining and petroleum in future. Mining has historically been the mainstay of the South African economy. Mineral exports remain the principal contributor to foreign exchange earnings on the current account. South Africa is not yet a significant producer of crude oil or natural gas. Oil and gas exploration nevertheless shows promise. Taxation is far from top of the list in current challenges facing the development of extractive industries in South Africa. The national goal of economic and social transformation in favor of Historically Disadvantaged South Africans has major impact on the mining sector.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper discusses Senegal’s Seventh Review Under the Policy Support Instrument (PSI) and Request for Modification of Assessment Criteria. GDP growth was lower than expected in 2013 but would increase to 4.9 percent in 2014 with a rebound in agriculture, mining, and industry. All quantitative assessment criteria and indicative targets for end-2013 were met, including on the budget deficit despite a significant revenue shortfall. Structural reform implementation has been slow, with many benchmarks met after their respective deadlines. Despite challenging prospects for 2014, the authorities intend to continue reducing the deficit. The IMF staff recommends completion of the seventh PSI review.
International Monetary Fund
Niger’s GDP growth is projected to decline in 2009 to 3 percent from 9.5 percent in 2008 when agricultural production reached a record level. The staff report highlights Niger’s second review under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility and Request for Modification of Performance Criteria. The country appears relatively protected from the international downturn. Niger’s economic performance has been positive in 2008 with a surge in GDP growth up to 9.5 percent from 3.3 percent in 2007.
International Monetary Fund
This Recent Economic Developments and Selected Economic Issues paper provides a broad overview of the structure of Namibia’s economy. It provides a detailed discussion of the structure and evolution of the productive base, recent trends in investment and savings performance, fiscal policies, monetary issues and policies, and external sector developments. The paper provides an assessment of Namibia’s export performance and prospects for the future. The paper highlights that since independence in 1990, Namibia’s real GDP has expanded at an annual compound rate of 3.8 percent, or 0.9 percent in per capita terms.