Business and Economics > Industries: Financial Services

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Mr. Rabah Arezki, Mr. Patrick Bolton, Sanjay Peters, Frederic Samama, and Joseph Stiglitz
This paper investigates the emerging global landscape for public-private co-investments in infrastructure. The creation of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and other so-called “infrastructure investment platforms” are an attempt to tap into the pool of both public and private long-term savings in order to channel the latter into much needed infrastructure projects. This paper puts these new initiatives into perspective by critically reviewing the literature and experience with public private partnerships in infrastructure. It concludes by identifying the main challenges policy makers and other actors will need to confront going forward and to turn infrastructure into an asset class of its own.
International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

La Oficina de Evaluación Independiente (OEI) fue creada por el Directorio Ejecutivo del FMI en 2001. Proporciona evaluaciones objetivas e independientes sobre asuntos relacionados con el FMI. La OEI opera con independencia de la Gerencia y sin interferencias del Directorio Ejecutivo del FMI. Véase más información sobre las actividades de la OEl en su sitio web: www.ieo-imf.org.

International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

Le Bureau indépendant d’évaluation (BIE) a été créé en 2001 par le conseil d'administration du FMI. Il évalue de manière objective et indépendante des questions liées au FMI. Le BIE fonctionne en toute indépendance de la direction et du Conseil d’administration du FMI. Pour en savoir plus sur les activités du BIE, visitez son site web : www.ieo-imf.org.

International Monetary Fund. Independent Evaluation Office

Abstract

This evaluation examines factors influencing the effectiveness of the IMF structural conditionality in bringing about structural reform. It assesses the impact of the streamlining initiative launched in 2000 and of the 2002 Conditionality Guidelines. These guidelines aimed at reducing the volume and scope of structural conditionality by requiring “parsimony” in the use of conditions and stipulated that conditions must be “critical” to the achievement of the program goals. The evaluation finds that during the period 1995–2004, there was extensive use of structural conditionality in IMF-supported programs, with an average of 17 conditions per program/year.

Ms. Natalia T. Tamirisa, Mr. Alexander Lehmann, and Mr. Jaroslaw Wieczorek
This paper reviews the characteristics of international trade in services and of the World Trade Organization’s General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) framework, which was established to regulate it. Further liberalization of services trade in developing countries, as currently envisaged in the context of the WTO Doha Development Agenda, holds a number of potential benefits, such as underpinning the liberalization of goods trade, but it is also being resisted due to its potential adjustment costs. Two implications for IMF activities are examined: coherence among the three principal international economic institutions and sequencing with macroeconomic stabilization and regulatory reforms.
International Monetary Fund
This paper evaluates Turkey’s Second Review Under the Stand-By Arrangement (SBA). Since the completion of the Article IV Consultation and the first review in April 2002, macroeconomic policies have remained in line with the program. All quantitative performance criteria for end-March and end-April have been met. In light of continued strong program implementation, the IMF staff recommends the completion of the second review. Strict implementation has already produced tangible economic gains, and the authorities are determined to stay the course.
International Monetary Fund
Colombia's economic performance deteriorated markedly in the last half of 1998 and during 1999 under the combined influence of external shocks and a weakening of confidence. In an effort to reverse the deterioration, the authorities developed a multiyear stabilization and reform program based on fiscal consolidation, exchange rate flexibility bank restructuring, and structural reforms. Indications suggested that economic activity in Colombia has been recovering and the IMF-supported extended program remains on track. The IMF staff welcomed the authorities' reaffirmation of the strategies and policies underlying the program.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Stanley Fischer, IMF First Deputy Managing Director for the past seven years, stepped down from his position at the end of August. Fischer was appointed in 1994 to an initial five-year term and to a second term in 1999. He was previously the Killian Professor and head of the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From 1988 to 1990, he served as Vice President for Development Economics and Chief Economist at the World Bank. Fischer recently spoke with the IMF Survey about his experience at the IMF and the changes he has witnessed during his tenure.