Business and Economics > Investments: Energy

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Mr. Amine Mati, Ms. Monique Newiak, and James Wilson
This paper focuses on identifying potential asymmetric responses of non-commodity output growth in times of positive and negative commodity terms-of-trade shocks. Using a sample of 27 oil-exporting countries and a panel VAR method, the study finds: 1) the short-and medium-run response of real non-commodity GDP growth is larger for negative shocks than positive shocks; 2) this asymmetry is more pronounced in countries with weak pre-existing fundamentals–high levels of public debt and low levels of international reserves–which also serve to amplify the volatility of the response; 3) the output response to positive shocks is stronger following a sustained period of CTOT increases, while the impact of negative shocks on output are more damaging when they occur after a period of CTOT decline.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This Selected Issues paper looks at some Central African Economic and Monetary Community (CEMAC) specific regional dimensions of a possible strategy to enhance governance, which would support specific reforms in this area at the country level. The paper describes the specific dimensions of governance covered in the note. The paper also analyzes governance and corruption in the areas of public financial management, anti-money laundering, and the link between the oil sector and public resources. The CEMAC regional institutions will have to play a central role to lead progress in these areas, and support member countries’ own efforts. Due to such actions result in giving a coherent framework to actions conducted at the country level, the synergic dimension can spur a virtuous circle, key to earn the benefit of an economic and monetary union. The success of the regional strategy that CEMAC member countries and regional institutions are implementing to exit the severe crisis they are facing depends critically on creating the conditions for laying the ground for a diversified economy, within a well-functioning regional market and an environment that provides opportunities for all and where public resources are geared to most productive use.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This Selected Issues paper discusses the structure of the financial sector in Chad and describes the key macro-financial linkages. Macro-financial linkages in Chad are driven by a government sector that dominates economic activities in the more modern sectors of the economy, thanks to oil-related revenues. The main macro-financial linkages are indirect through the associated sharp fiscal adjustment and the government’s quest for additional financing. Direct credit risks linked to the oil sector appear limited. However, there seems to be a link between declining oil prices and deteriorating banking soundness indicators. The current economic conditions negatively affect private companies dependent on public contracts, potentially hitting the health of banks’ loan portfolios.
Ms. Sharmini Coorey and Mr. Bernardin Akitoby

Abstract

En dépit de ses vastes richesses pétrolières, l'Afrique centrale se débat encore pour promouvoir une croissance robuste et solidaire, ou pour offrir suffisamment de perspectives d'emploi à sa population, en particulier aux jeunes. S'appuyant sur de nouveaux travaux, cet ouvrage explique les défis macroéconomiques que doit relever la région, examine la gestion de la richesse pétrolière et ses répercussions pour la réduction de la pauvreté et présente quatre études de cas représentatives des enseignements qui ont été tirés.

International Monetary Fund
Depuis plusieurs années, le FMI publie un nombre croissant de rapports et autres documents couvrant l'évolution et les tendances économiques et financières dans les pays membres. Chaque rapport, rédigé par une équipe des services du FMI à la suite d'entretiens avec des représentants des autorités, est publié avec l'accord du pays concerné.
Ms. Sharmini Coorey and Mr. Bernardin Akitoby

Abstract

Despite its vast oil wealth, central Africa still struggles to sustain strong, inclusive economic growth and to generate sufficient employment opportunities, particularly for its fast-growing youth population. Drawing on new research, Oil Wealth in Central Africa lays out the macroeconomic and growth challenges facing the region; examines oil wealth management and its implications for poverty reduction; and includes four case studies that exemplify lessons learned.

International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses the common policies adopted by the members of the Central African Economic and Monetary Community (CEMAC). The macroeconomic performance was good in 2011 with improved fiscal balances, public investment programs, and higher reserves. However, CEMAC is facing challenges from deep-seated structural problems, including uncoordinated fiscal policy, financial sector weaknesses, and obstacles to growth and competitiveness. The Executive Board recommends monetary policies for financial stability and suggest making monetary policies an efficient tool of macroeconomic management. Also, the Board recommends strengthening of governance of CEMAC’s common institutions.
International Monetary Fund
Member countries of the Central African Economic and Monetary Community are recovering from the global financial crisis, although growth in 2011 has not returned to precrisis levels. Executive Directors welcomed the region’s economic recovery from the global financial crisis and its overall positive outlook. Directors noted, however, that the recovery has been uneven across member countries and that inflation is on the rise owing to high international food and fuel prices. Directors encouraged the authorities to adopt an appropriate policy mix to contain inflationary pressures in the short term.
Ms. Alexandra Tabova and Ms. Carol L Baker
Non-oil growth in the CFA oil exporting countries has been lackluster despite their great natural resource wealth. In this paper we study the key determinants of non-oil growth and explore to what extent these countries differ from countries with comparable levels of development that do not depend on nonrenewable resources. Using a panel of 38 countries comprising LICs and CFA zone oil exporters, we find that while real exchange rate appreciation negatively impacted growth in all countries over the period 1985-2008, what distinguishes the oil producers of the CFA zone is the failure of public and private investment to spur non-oil growth.
John M. Piotrowski, Mr. David Coady, Justin Tyson, Mr. Rolando Ossowski, Mr. Robert Gillingham, and Mr. Shamsuddin Tareq
Petroleum product subsidies have again started to increase with the rebound in international prices. This note reviews recent developments in subsidy levels and argues that reforming the policy framework for setting petroleum product prices is necessary to reduce the fiscal burden of these subsidies and to address climate change. Between 2003 and mid-2008, global consumer subsidies for petroleum products are estimated to have increased more than eightfold, from $57 billion to $490 billion. Although subsidies decreased to $136 billion by mid-2009, they are projected to increase to $237 billion by end-2010 (or nearly 0.3 percent of global GDP). Tax-inclusive subsidies, reflecting sub-optimal taxation of petroleum products, are projected to increase to $733 billion, or 1.0 percent of global GDP. G-20 countries account for over 70 percent of tax-inclusive subsidies. Halving tax-inclusive subsidies could reduce projected fiscal deficits in subsidizing countries by one-sixth and greenhouse emissions by around 15 percent. Subsidy reform strategies should contain measures to mitigate the impact of higher prices on the poorest groups.