Europe > Bosnia and Herzegovina

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International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper discusses the current status of banking supervision and regulation in Montenegro in the context of select Basel Core Principles. It provides a brief overview of the financial system structure, bank system performance, and the framework for financial oversight. Laws, regulations, and supervision have improved significantly since the 2006 Financial Sector Assessment Program to align more closely with Basel and EU requirements. The banking sector dominates the financial system and accounts for about 90 percent of financial system assets, equivalent to about 93 percent of GDP as of June 2015. There are currently 14 banks operating in Montenegro, up from 11 in 2013.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper discusses key findings and recommendations of the Detailed Assessment of Observance of the CPMI–IOSCO (Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures–International Organization of Securities Commissions) Principles for Financial Market Infrastructures in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Major achievements have been made in modernizing the payment system. Resiliency of the interbank payment system was demonstrated against the severe floods of May 2014. The currency board arrangement has helped protect the payment system from credit risks. The formal assessment of the real-time gross settlement system suggests that many of the standards are observed. The legal basis is relatively sound, but finality and netting arrangements require greater legal certainty and protection at the law level.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This Technical Note discusses results of Banking Sector Stress Testing for Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). The stress tests focused on the banking system and covered all 27 banks operating in BiH. System-wide solvency and liquidity indicators appear broadly appropriate, but significant pockets of vulnerability remain. On the basis of the supervisory data used, stress tests suggest that aggregate stress losses, mainly related to increased provisions in the loan book, although non-negligible, remain broadly manageable. Similarly, system-wide liquidity ratios appear broadly adequate. Nevertheless, there are several banks within the system—mainly small domestically owned banks—with a wide range of significant vulnerabilities. These include, low liquidity ratios, large concentration risks, and round-trip cross-border exposures.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This Technical Note presents an update on Banking Sector Supervision Core Principles Implementation in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The system of banking supervision oversight has significantly improved since the last review in 2006, but shortcomings remain. Both supervisory authorities have made progress in enhancing the regulatory framework and supervisory processes since the 2006 Financial Sector Assessment Program. The banking agencies are in the process of preparing a new Law on Banks that should address deficiencies in the supervisory powers, resolution tools, and consolidated supervision. Comprehensive regulations on risk management have been drafted that will address remaining deficiencies that are highlighted in this assessment.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper discusses key findings of the Financial System Stability Assessment on Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). Economic and financial activity in BiH remains stuck in a low gear since the global financial crisis, reflecting weak external demand, tighter funding conditions, and deep-seated structural issues. Aggregate solvency and liquidity indicators appear broadly sound, but significant pockets of vulnerability exist. The banking system is more than 80 percent foreign-owned banks. The average regulatory capital adequacy ratio exceeded 16 percent as of end 2014. Decisive and timely actions to deal with weak banks are critical for preserving financial stability.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper discusses key findings of the Financial System Stability Assessment on Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). The financial system in BiH is still dealing with the aftershocks of the global financial crisis as well as deep-seated vulnerabilities. A high system-wide nonperforming loan ratio reflects the impact of the crisis, low growth since then, and a history of lax lending policies. Bank governance problems, weak supervision powers, and related-party loans are obstacles to addressing asset quality problems and re-establishing bank profitability. Banking and insurance oversight have improved since the 2006 Financial Sector Assessment Program, but supervisors’ corrective and enforcement powers are weak and identifying ultimate beneficial owners and related-party lending is problematic.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper analyzes the challenges that the Republic of Slovenia will face in the coming years. It examines the efficiency of the Slovene banking sector in the European Union context. The paper analyzes indicators of bank efficiency by comparing performance indicators for banks in Slovenia, the European Monetary Union, and new member states. It presents results from cross-country econometric estimates of banking sector cost efficiency. The paper also discusses results from estimates of cross-country banking sector contestability, and the determinants of efficiency and contestability.
Mr. David S. Hoelscher, Mr. Michael W Taylor, and Mr. Ulrich H Klueh

Abstract

This paper describes recently established deposit insurance systems, identifying emerging trends. In line with previous IMF work on the subject, it argues against the development of "best practices" applicable to all systems. Rather, it stresses the importance of incorporating each country’s individual objectives in adopting a deposit insurance system, as well as that country’s characteristics, to ensure an effective system that minimizes disincentives and distortions to financial sector intermediation. The paper includes a summary of the academic literature.

International Monetary Fund
Economic growth in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) has been impressive with GDP. The dominance of foreign-owned bank subsidiaries has transformed the financial sector and altered the risks to financial stability. Reforms should focus on strengthening banking supervision and adapting it to the transformation of the financial system in line with recommendations in the Basel Core Principles (BCP) assessment. Although the insurance sector is too small to be systemically important, the unsettled conditions in the sector could weaken confidence in the financial system.