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International Monetary Fund. European Dept.

Abstract

Europe Regional Economic Outlook, The European Recovery: Policy Recalibration and Sectoral Reallocation, October 2021

International Monetary Fund. European Dept.

Abstract

This report analyses the main economic developments and achievements in the Western Balkan countries, and lays out the key macroeconomic policy challenges for the future.

International Monetary Fund
The composition of short-term and medium-term adjustment measures will facilitate sufficient short-term adjustment flexibility, and be consistent with medium-term fiscal sustainability. Improving debt resolution instruments will help the banks to regain confidence in lending. Meanwhile, there is a need to consider improvements in its liquidity framework. The main factors that shaped the economic growth model in Moldova in the last decade and the risks of the current growth model are outlined. Public policies can promote growth by identifying and addressing the most binding constraints to development.
International Monetary Fund
Inflation in Southeastern European (SEE) countries has been comparable with euro area inflation, partly owing to on the one hand, high initial price levels. On the other hand, the exchange rate regime is of paramount importance, including the inflation-targeting regime pursued in Albania. The analysis also explores additional heterogeneity between SEE and other regions. Two fiscal rules—a debt rule and an expenditure rule with a debt brake—are discussed in the context of Albania’s current economic outlook. Both rules will contribute toward enhancing fiscal sustainability in Albania.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses the request from the Bosnia and Herzegovina authorities for a Stand-By Arrangement. The global financial and economic crisis hit Bosnia and Herzegovina when the overheating was already raising doubts about the sustainability of the economic expansion. The authorities’ comprehensive financial sector strategy aims at strengthening the banking sector and improving crisis preparedness. IMF staff supports the authorities’ plans to enhance the monitoring of financial stability by establishing a standing committee in charge of crisis prevention and management, and by signing a formal memorandum of understanding on cooperation.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper for Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) reports that GDP per capita in BiH is similar to that in neighboring Balkan countries. BiH risks are falling behind rather than catching up with other transition economies in terms of its economic development. This could delay the process of convergence to and integration with the European Union, including its ambitions to eventually adopt the euro. Accelerated structural reforms and macroeconomic stability remain key to achieving higher and sustained growth rates.
Connel Fullenkamp, Mr. Thomas F. Cosimano, Michael T. Gapen, Mr. Ralph Chami, Mr. Peter J Montiel, and Mr. Adolfo Barajas

Abstract

Given the large size of aggregate remittance flows (billions of dollars annually), they should be expected to have significant macroeconomic effects on the economies that receive them. This paper directly addresses the two main issues of interest to policymakers with regard to remittances--how to manage their macroeconomic effects, and how to harness their development potential--by reporting the results of the first global study of the comprehensive macroeconomic effects of remittances on recipient economies. In broad terms, the findings of this paper tend to confirm the main benefit cited in the microeconomic literature: remittances improve households' welfare by lifting families out of poverty and insuring them against income shocks. The findings also yield a number of important caveats and policy considerations, however, that have largely been overlooked. The main challenge for policymakers in countries that receive significant flows of remittances is to design policies that promote remittances and increase their benefits while mitigating adverse side effects. Getting these policy prescriptions correct early on is imperative. Globalization and the aging of developed economy populations will ensure that demand for migrant workers remains robust for years to come. Hence, the volume of remittances likely will continue to grow, and with it, the challenge of unlocking the maximum societal benefit from these transfers.

International Monetary Fund
This 2007 Article IV Consultation highlights that the economy of Bosnia and Herzegovina is enjoying its fourth consecutive year of stable growth underpinned by the currency board. Export growth of 29 percent on the back of productivity gains, export price increases, and improvements in reporting following the introduction of the VAT, combined with robust domestic demand, pushed real GDP up 6 percent in 2006. Fiscal policy has thus far been prudent. This good overall picture reflects a benign external environment and the effects of past economic reforms.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.