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International Monetary Fund
The net administrative budget for FY2017 has been set at US$1,072.5 million. After four years of zero real growth, the FY 2017 budget includes an increase of ½ percent in constant dollar terms to cover the institution’s rising IT and physical security costs, as well as a small adjustment for increases in the salary structure and in the costs of non-personnel expenses. The budget envelope also entails reallocation measures of 1.5 percent of resources and institution-wide savings to meet new high priority tasks and commitments to the membership. The FY2017 capital budget, set at US$60.5 million, provides financing for new capital projects for building facilities and IT.
Miss Rita Mesias

Abstract

This Coordinated Direct Investment Survey Guide (Guide) has been prepared to assist economies in participating in the Coordinated Direct Investment Survey (CDIS). The CDIS is being conducted under the auspices of the Statistics Department of the IMF across a wide range of economies. The survey is conducted simultaneously by all participating economies; uses consistent definitions; and encourages best practices in collecting, compiling, and disseminating data on direct investment positions. The CDIS is thus an important tool in capturing world totals and the geographic distribution of direct investment positions, thereby contributing to important new understandings of the extent of globalization, and improving the overall quality of direct investment data worldwide. As of the writing of this updated Guide, more than 100 economies participate in the CDIS.

International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This 2015 Article IV Consultation highlights that Aruba has been recovering from a severe double-dip recession. The economy faced two major shocks over the past five years—the global financial crisis and shutdown of the Valero oil refinery in 2012. After a strong recovery in 2013 with growth reaching 4.75 percent, the pace of activity moderated in 2014. In 2015, growth is projected to rise to 2.25 percent. The tourism sector—the mainstay of the Aruban economy—is envisaged to grow, albeit at a slower rate. Moreover, domestic demand is slated to recover notably amid subsiding policy uncertainty and as key public-private partnership projects move forward.
International Monetary Fund
Aruba has an open economy with a history of stability-oriented macroeconomic policies. Adverse external shocks have led to a decline in tourism and disruption of oil refinery operations. Serious fiscal challenges need to be addressed and a fiscal adjustment program is needed to safeguard the sustainability of the public finances. Expenditure cuts and the central bank’s switch from a credit ceiling to an unremunerated reserves requirement as key policy tool is commended. The new monetary policy framework will likely increase the challenges to prudential regulation and supervision.
International Monetary Fund
The note gives statistical data on Aruba with regard to indicators of tourism activity, components of GDP, real GDP, contributions to real GDP, growth, changes in consumer price index, and legal minimum wages. The statistical data of operations of the central government, operational budget of the social insurance bank, financial balance, balance of payments summary, non-oil balance of payments summary are detailed. The balance sheets of bank-like institutions, life insurance companies, and pension funds are given along with utilities housing mortgage statistics.
International Monetary Fund
This assessment of financial sector supervision and regulation for the Kingdom of the Netherlands—Aruba discusses its financial sector, which is primarily domestically orientated with limited offshore financial sector activity. The system for banking supervision and regulation in Aruba was found to be compliant or largely compliant with 19 of the Basel Core Principles (BCP). Aruba had improved its rules and systems, and was cooperating effectively with other jurisdictions on antimoney laundering (AML).
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses detailed assessment of compliance with the Basel Core Principles for effective banking supervision for the Kingdom of the Netherlands—Aruba. Aruba’s offshore banking sector is small by international standards, with only two institutions registered. The mission also recommends that the Central Bank of Aruba (CBA) meet with management to better understand their plans for their Aruban operations and their financial results. Aruba remains open to foreign investment and migrant workers, who make up 40 percent of the population and have been key contributors to economic growth.
International Monetary Fund
This supplement reviews the data received thus far and the progress made by participating jurisdictions in their dissemination efforts. Data for major jurisdictions that declined to participate are also provided where it is available from published sources. In addition, data on a sample of advanced economies are provided for comparative purposes. The framework identified a minimum set of variables for dissemination and recommended that jurisdictions publish data on those variables although jurisdictions could choose to publish more. Tables 2 and 5 to 13 provide the data received on those variables. The framework also identified additional variables that were to be provided to the Fund to help Fund staff monitor developments in financial centers.
International Monetary Fund
Aruba is one of the most developed islands in the Caribbean. Still, it is vulnerable to external shocks owing to its heavy dependence on tourism and a steady increase in public debt. Policies to support further fiscal consolidation and boost Aruba’s growth potential are needed. Maintaining macroeconomic stability will require fiscal adjustment and an appropriately tight monetary policy. Bolstering the growth potential will require creating the right conditions for private investment and diversification. The financial system is generally sound, but warrants continued supervisory vigilance.