Western Hemisphere > Aruba

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International Monetary Fund
This assessment of financial sector supervision and regulation for the Kingdom of the Netherlands—Aruba discusses its financial sector, which is primarily domestically orientated with limited offshore financial sector activity. The system for banking supervision and regulation in Aruba was found to be compliant or largely compliant with 19 of the Basel Core Principles (BCP). Aruba had improved its rules and systems, and was cooperating effectively with other jurisdictions on antimoney laundering (AML).
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses detailed assessment of compliance with the Basel Core Principles for effective banking supervision for the Kingdom of the Netherlands—Aruba. Aruba’s offshore banking sector is small by international standards, with only two institutions registered. The mission also recommends that the Central Bank of Aruba (CBA) meet with management to better understand their plans for their Aruban operations and their financial results. Aruba remains open to foreign investment and migrant workers, who make up 40 percent of the population and have been key contributors to economic growth.
International Monetary Fund
The 2008 Article IV Consultation analyzes the promise of fiscal discipline and debt relief that has boosted investor confidence and growth in the Kingdom of the Netherlands—Netherlands Antilles. Although exports moderated temporarily, tourism was a bright spot owing to improvements in competitiveness as a result of infrastructure investments, and cost controls from immigration. Executive Directors encouraged the authorities to take the opportunity provided by the large debt relief from the Netherlands government under the dissolution agreement to set the budget and the economy on a more sustainable footing.
International Monetary Fund
This 2005 Article IV Consultation for the Netherlands Antilles’ reports that economic growth has been feeble so far in this decade, in the midst of economic policy drift. Growth has been constrained by still inflexible labor markets, widespread state ownership and interference in commercial activities, and insufficient investment in infrastructure and human capital. At the same time, free migration to the Netherlands has kept wages high. Persistent budget deficits and a large and growing public debt have also remained unaddressed.
International Monetary Fund
This detailed assessment of the observance of standards and codes in the financial sector of the Kingdom of the Netherlands—Netherlands Antilles reviews implementation of the Basel Core Principles for effective banking. Legal provisions are in place entrusting the Bank of the Netherlands Antilles (BNA) to regulate the insurance sector and designate it as the licensing authority. The BNA considered that asset quality issues were relevant primarily for domestic institutions and less for international banks in the Netherlands Antilles.