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IMF Research Perspective (formerly published as IMF Research Bulletin) is a new, redesigned online newsletter covering updates on IMF research. In the inaugural issue of the newsletter, Hites Ahir interviews Valeria Cerra; and they discuss the economic environment 10 years after the global financial crisis. Research Summaries cover the rise of populism; economic reform; labor and technology; big data; and the relationship between happiness and productivity. Sweta C. Saxena was the guest editor for this inaugural issue.
International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.
The Research Summaries in the March 2013 Research Bulletin discuss "Trade Finance and Its Role in the Great Trade Collapse" (JaeBin Ahn) and "Sovereign Debt: How to Track Who Is Buying and Selling It" (Serkan Arslanalp and Takahiro Tsuda). The Q&A looks at "Seven Questions on the Implications of Global Supply Chains for Real Effective Exchange Rates" (Rudolfs Bems). Readers can also find in this issue a listing of recent IMF Working Papers, Staff Discussion Notes, and Recommended Readings from IMF Publications. The Bulletin also includes a call for papers for a research conference and information on free access to the IMF Economic Review in April.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper reviews the population policy in developed countries. The paper highlights that despite the weakness of population concerns in most developed countries compared with less-developed countries, most of the former have taken certain actions that affect, or are thought to affect, demographic events. These actions include such measures as appointing official commissions to study the country’s demographic situation and advise the government what to do; providing birth control services as part of the public health system; and so on. This paper also summarizes the conclusions drawn by Dr. Berelson from the 25 country reports.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper discusses the study on development planning conducted by a small group within the World Bank. The study reveals that most countries not only encounter the same planning problems, they make the same mistakes. The paper highlights that although most countries with development plans have not succeeded in carrying them out, some countries without national development plans or national planning agencies have been developing rapidly. The paper also highlights that the lack of government support is the prime reason why so few development plans are carried out.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Abstract

This paper analyses relatively little overall progress in the formal relaxation of restrictions. Certainly, progress in this respect was much less than in the immediately preceding years. On the other hand, there was a significant strengthening of most internationally traded currencies, particularly in the opening months of 1958. The rates in free markets began to approximate the rates in official markets. In this respect, there was continued progress toward what is commonly called external convertibility, although the present position still falls short of formal external convertibility. In some countries, restrictions were relaxed to only a limited extent, partly because earlier relaxations had left only restrictions of a protective nature and partly because of the more complex nature of the economic trends which characterized the period. In the light of these trends and, more particularly, of the currency speculation which arose during the middle of the period, it is notable that most countries were able to defend the progress toward freer trade and payments which had been made earlier.