Flagships

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 22 items for :

  • Type: Journal Issue x
  • Unemployment x
Clear All Modify Search
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

Abstract

A fragile recovery continues in the Middle East and Central Asia region. The region has made good progress since the beginning of the year, but new challenges have emerged. They include a pandemic wave in countries with weak vaccination progress and rising inflation, which has contributed to declining monetary policy space, adding to the difficulties posed by limited fiscal policy space. Additionally, divergent recoveries and concerns about economic scarring persist. Inequities are also on the rise, and countries will need to tackle the pandemic’s impact on debt, labor markets, and the corporate sector. Countries will face difficult tradeoffs amid this challenging environment as they continue to manage the current crisis. Ramping up vaccine acquisition and distribution remains the most urgent short-term priority. Additional support should be well targeted, and central banks may need to raise interest rates if inflation expectations start to increase. Improving policy frameworks will be important to reduce policy tradeoffs. Preparing for a new chapter by investing in a transformational recovery will be vital to the region’s future. Important priorities include reorienting the role of the state toward health, education, and social safety nets; leveraging global trends like digitalization; and investing in climate-resilient technology.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

The global economy is climbing out from the depths to which it had plummeted during the Great Lockdown in April. But with the COVID-19 pandemic continuing to spread, many countries have slowed reopening and some are reinstating partial lockdowns to protect susceptible populations. While recovery in China has been faster than expected, the global economy’s long ascent back to pre-pandemic levels of activity remains prone to setbacks.

International Monetary Fund. European Dept.

Abstract

Europe continues to enjoy a strong growth spurt. Growth has firmed up in many European economies and the forecast is for more of the same. Real GDP increased by 2.8 percent in 2017, up from 1.8 percent in 2016. The expansion is largely driven by domestic demand, with investment increasingly contributing. Credit growth has finally picked up, which is helping Europe’s banks to rebuild profitability. While leading indicators have recently begun to ease, they remain at high levels. Accordingly, the forecast is for growth to stay strong, reaching 2.6 percent in 2018 and 2.2 percent in 2019. Amid the good times, however, fiscal adjustment and structural reforms efforts are flagging.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

Global economic prospects have improved again, but the bumpy recovery and skewed macroeconomic policy mix in advanced economies are complicating policymaking in emerging market economies. Chapter 3 examines the prospects for inflation, particularly because inflation was remarkably stable in the wake of the Great Recession and, in fact, has become less responsive to cyclical conditions. Chapter 4 examines whether today’s fast-growing, dynamic low-income countries are likely to maintain their momentum and avoid the reversals that afflicted many such countries in the past.

International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

Abstract

The Arab Spring holds the promise of improved living standards and a more prosperous future for the peoples of the Middle East and North Africa region. At the same time, the region is witnessing uncertainty and economic pressures from domestic and external sources, which will likely be exacerbated by the recent worsening of the global economy. The main challenge in the short term will be to manage expectations while maintaining economic stability. To that end, better-targeted subsidies and transfers will help free up resources for investment in infrastructure, education, and health. Policies aimed at fostering inclusive growth will also help cement the longer-term benefits of the ongoing changes in the region. In the Caucasus and Central Asia, the economic outlook is broadly positive. Exports and remittances--key growth drivers in 2010--are continuing to grow solidly, helping the recovery gain firm momentum. At the same time, uncertainties over the robustness of the global recovery constitute a downside risk to the growth outlook. Key challenges facing the region over the medium term are to create jobs and foster high and inclusive growth.

International Monetary Fund. European Dept.

Abstract

The May 2011 Regional Economic Outlook: Europe anticipates that recovery in the region will solidify, with recoveries in advanced and emerging Europe likely to be mutually reinforcing. Advanced Europe continues to absorb most of emerging Europe's exports, while the role of emerging Europe as a market for advanced Europe will expand. Chapters discuss the outlook and policy priorities for advanced and emerging Europe, and analyze the role of financial integration in the buildup and resolution of imbalances within the euro area.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

The global economic recovery is progressing better than expected, but the speed of recovery varies, as outlined in the April 2010 World Economic Outlook. Some countries, notably in Asia, are off to a strong start, but growth in others is constrained by lasting damage to the financial sector and to household balance sheets. The challenge for policymakers is to ensure a smooth transition of demand, while maintaining supports that promote growth and employment. There is also a need to contain and reduce public debt and repair and reform the financial sector. This issue of the WEO also explores two other key challenges in the wake of the Great Recession: how to spur job creation in the face of likely high and persistent unemployment in advanced economies, and how countries that previously ran large current account surpluses or deficits can promote growth by rebalancing external and domestic demand.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

The global economic recovery is progressing better than expected, but the speed of recovery varies, as outlined in the April 2010 World Economic Outlook. Some countries, notably in Asia, are off to a strong start, but growth in others is constrained by lasting damage to the financial sector and to household balance sheets. The challenge for policymakers is to ensure a smooth transition of demand, while maintaining supports that promote growth and employment. There is also a need to contain and reduce public debt and repair and reform the financial sector. This issue of the WEO also explores two other key challenges in the wake of the Great Recession: how to spur job creation in the face of likely high and persistent unemployment in advanced economies, and how countries that previously ran large current account surpluses or deficits can promote growth by rebalancing external and domestic demand.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

La reprise de l’économie mondiale a évolué mieux que prévu, mais l’activité se redresse à des rythmes différents, comme le souligne l'édition d'avril 2010 des Perspectives de l'économie mondiale. Certains pays sont bien partis, notamment en Asie, mais dans d'autres, la croissance est entravée par les dommages durables causés au secteur financier et au portefeuille des ménages. Les dirigeants ont pour tâche de veiller à une transition en douceur de la demande, tout en préservant les éléments favorables à la croissance et l'emploi. Il est également nécessaire de maîtriser et de réduire la dette publique, ainsi que de réparer et de réformer le secteur financier. Cette édition des Perspectives de l’économie mondiale se penche également sur deux grands défis au lendemain de la grande récession : comment stimuler la création d'emplois dans les pays avancés qui présentent un taux de chômage élevé, probablement persistant, et comment les pays qui présentaient déjà un important excédent ou déficit du compte courant peuvent-ils promouvoir la croissance en équilibrant la demande extérieure et intérieure ?

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

Como se describió en la edición de abril de 2010 de Perspectivas de la economía mundial, la recuperación de la economía mundial avanza mejor de lo esperado, pero a velocidades diferentes. Algunos países, en especial los asiáticos, han tenido un gran comienzo, pero en otros el crecimiento se ve limitado por el daño perdurable en el sector financiero y en los balances de los hogares. El reto para las autoridades es asegurar que la transición de la demanda no registre contratiempos, y a la vez mantener la asistencia para fomentar el crecimiento y empleo. También existe la necesidad de contener y reducir la deuda pública y sanear y reformar el sector financiero. Este número de Perspectivas de la economía mundial también examina otros dos retos fundamentales a los que se hace frente tras la Gran Recesión: cómo estimular la creación de puestos de trabajo dado que el desempleo en las economías avanzadas seguramente se mantendrá en niveles elevados; y cómo fomentar el crecimiento en los países con grandes superávits o déficits en cuenta corriente, recuperando el equilibrio entre demanda externa e interna.