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International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The current Global Financial Stability Report (April 2016) finds that global financial stability risks have risen since the last report in October 2015. The new report finds that the outlook has deteriorated in advanced economies because of heightened uncertainty and setbacks to growth and confidence, while declines in oil and commodity prices and slower growth have kept risks elevated in emerging markets. These developments have tightened financial conditions, reduced risk appetite, raised credit risks, and stymied balance sheet repair. A broad-based policy response is needed to secure financial stability. Advanced economies must deal with crisis legacy issues, emerging markets need to bolster their resilience to global headwinds, and the resilience of market liquidity should be enhanced. The report also examines financial spillovers from emerging market economies and finds that they have risen substantially. This implies that when assessing macro-financial conditions, policymakers may need to increasingly take into account economic developments in emerging market economies. Finally, the report assesses changes in the systemic importance of insurers, finding that across advanced economies the contribution of life insurers to systemic risk has increased in recent years. The results suggest that supervisors and regulators should take a more macroprudential approach to the sector.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The global financial system is still in a period of significant uncertainty. Although the ongoing recovery is expected to gradual strengthen balance sheets, progress toward stability has experienced a setback since the April 2010 GFSR. As discussed in this October 2010 report, policymakers in many advanced countries need to confront the interactions created by slow growth, rising sovereign indebtedness, and still fragile financial institutions by addressing legacy problems in the banking system, strengthening the fundamentals of sovereign and bank balance sheets, and clarifying regulatory reforms.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

Published twice yearly, the Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) was created to provide a more frequent assessment of global financial markets by the IMF and to address emerging market financing in a global context. It provides timely analysis of developments in both mature and emerging market countries and seeks to identify potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crisis. The GFSR aims to deepen its readers’ understanding of global capital flows, which play a critical role as an engine of world economic growth. Of key value, the report focuses on current conditions in global financial markets, highlighting issues of financial imbalances, and of a structural nature, that could pose risks to financial market stability and sustained market access by emerging market borrowers.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This semi-annual publication from the IMF provides comprehensive coverage of mature and emerging financial markets and seeks to identify potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crises. It is designed to deepen understanding of global capital flows, which play a critical role as an engine of world economic growth.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) provides expert and up-to-date analysis of global capital flows that play a critical role in world economic growth and Financial stability. The report focuses on current conditions in global Financial markets, analyzing Financial imbalances and structural issues that could pose risks to stability and sustained market access by emerging market borrowers. Along with the IMF’s semiannual World Economic Outlook, the GFSR is a key vehicle for communicating the IMF’s multilateral surveillance. The GFSR also draws out the Financial ramifcations of economic imbalances highlighted by the WEO, making it an indispensable companion publication.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report (GSFR), published twice a year by the IMF, provides timely analysis of developments in mature and emerging market countries and seeks to identify potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crisis. The GFSR aims to deepen its readers’ understanding of global capital flows, which play a critical role as an engine of world economic growth. Along with the IMF’s semiannual World Economic Outlook, the GFSR is a key vehicle for the IMF’s multilateral surveillance. The Global Financial Stability Report was created to provide a more frequent assessment of global financial markets and to address emerging market financing in a global context. The report focuses on current conditions in global financial markets, highlighting issues of financial imbalances, and of a structural nature, that could pose risks to financial market stability and sustained market access by emerging market borrowers. The GFSR focuses on relevant contemporary issues, not attempting to be a comprehensive survey of all potential risks. It also draws out the financial ramifications of economic imbalances highlighted by the IMF’s World Economic Outlook. It regularly contains, as a special feature, articles on structural or systemic issues relevant to international financial stability.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This September 2004 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that over the past six months, the global financial system, especially the health of financial intermediaries, has been further strengthened by the broadening economic recovery. The financial system has not looked as resilient as it does in the summer of 2004, in the three years since the bursting of the equity bubble. Financial intermediaries, banks and nonbanks alike, have strengthened their balance sheets to a point where they could, if necessary, absorb considerable shocks.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report (GSFR), published twice a year by the IMF, provides timely analysis of developments in mature and emerging market countries and seeks to identify potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crisis. The GFSR aims to deepen its readers’ understanding of global capital flows, which play a critical role as an engine of world economic growth. Along with the IMF’s semiannual World Economic Outlook, the GFSR is a key vehicle for the IMF’s multilateral surveillance. The Global Financial Stability Report was created to provide a more frequent assessment of global financial markets and to address emerging market financing in a global context. The report focuses on current conditions in global financial markets, highlighting issues of financial imbalances, and of a structural nature, that could pose risks to financial market stability and sustained market access by emerging market borrowers. The GFSR focuses on relevant contemporary issues, not attempting to be a comprehensive survey of all potential risks. It also draws out the financial ramifications of economic imbalances highlighted by the IMF’s World Economic Outlook. It regularly contains, as a special feature, articles on structural or systemic issues relevant to international financial stability.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This September 2003 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that since March 2003, further progress has been made in addressing the lingering effects of the bursting of the equity price bubble. Household and corporate balance sheets have continued to improve gradually and corporate default levels have declined. Companies in mature markets have cut costs, enhancing their ability to cope with slower growth and other potential difficulties. Corporations—particularly in the United States—have made good progress in their financial consolidation efforts and are in a better financial position to increase investment spending.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This March 2003 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that the supportive stance of monetary policy in the major economies, coupled with more risk-averse behavior by both institutional and retail investors, has contributed to a sizable buildup of cash positions. A partial mobilization of these cash positions in the fourth quarter of 2002 helped fuel a short-lived stock market rally, led to a narrowing of credit spreads on mature and emerging bonds, and contributed to an increase in flows to emerging market borrowers.