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International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) provides expert and up-to-date analysis of global capital flows that play a critical role in world economic growth and Financial stability. The report focuses on current conditions in global Financial markets, analyzing Financial imbalances and structural issues that could pose risks to stability and sustained market access by emerging market borrowers. Along with the IMF’s semiannual World Economic Outlook, the GFSR is a key vehicle for communicating the IMF’s multilateral surveillance. The GFSR also draws out the Financial ramifcations of economic imbalances highlighted by the WEO, making it an indispensable companion publication.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The April 2012 Global Financial Stability Report assesses changes in risks to financial stability over the past six months, focusing on sovereign vulnerabilities, risks stemming from private sector deleveraging, and assessing the continued resilience of emerging markets. The report probes the implications of recent reforms in the financial system for market perception of safe assets, and investigates the growing public and private costs of increased longevity risk from aging populations.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) provides expert and up-to-date analysis of global capital flows that play a critical role in world economic growth and Financial stability. The report focuses on current conditions in global Financial markets, analyzing Financial imbalances and structural issues that could pose risks to stability and sustained market access by emerging market borrowers. Along with the IMF’s semiannual World Economic Outlook, the GFSR is a key vehicle for communicating the IMF’s multilateral surveillance. The GFSR also draws out the Financial ramifcations of economic imbalances highlighted by the WEO, making it an indispensable companion publication.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This paper presents an assessment of the shift in market risks to the household sector, which results from changes in the behavior of financial institutions and from pension reform. It focuses on household saving and asset allocation behavior and analyzes how such behavior may be affected by changes to household risk profiles. It examines the products and services that the financial industry has developed, or may need to develop, to help households meet these new challenges. The paper also discusses possible public policy initiatives on the promotion of a broader range of payout instruments and structures.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This paper analyzes aspects of global asset allocation. It examines how different institutional investors follow vastly different procedures when allocating assets, reflecting various time horizons, liability structures, and “cultural backgrounds.” It aims to provide some insight into the decision-making process of investors. The paper highlights that understanding the basis for investor decisions is useful when analyzing their asset allocation decisions and related capital flows across borders and asset classes. The paper also discusses the implications for financial stability of proposals and potential changes in accounting policy.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) provides expert and up-to-date analysis of global capital flows that play a critical role in world economic growth and Financial stability. The report focuses on current conditions in global Financial markets, analyzing Financial imbalances and structural issues that could pose risks to stability and sustained market access by emerging market borrowers. Along with the IMF’s semiannual World Economic Outlook, the GFSR is a key vehicle for communicating the IMF’s multilateral surveillance. The GFSR also draws out the Financial ramifcations of economic imbalances highlighted by the WEO, making it an indispensable companion publication.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This paper looks at the longer-term challenges pension funds face as population age and key issues to address to enhance their risk management practices and their role as long-term investors. The paper focuses primarily on Japan, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States, where funded pension plans are most developed. The size of pension savings in these countries, their projected growth, and the recent development of funded pension schemes in other countries highlight the fast-growing importance of pension funds for international capital markets and to financial stability.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This September 2004 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that over the past six months, the global financial system, especially the health of financial intermediaries, has been further strengthened by the broadening economic recovery. The financial system has not looked as resilient as it does in the summer of 2004, in the three years since the bursting of the equity bubble. Financial intermediaries, banks and nonbanks alike, have strengthened their balance sheets to a point where they could, if necessary, absorb considerable shocks.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This September 2003 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that since March 2003, further progress has been made in addressing the lingering effects of the bursting of the equity price bubble. Household and corporate balance sheets have continued to improve gradually and corporate default levels have declined. Companies in mature markets have cut costs, enhancing their ability to cope with slower growth and other potential difficulties. Corporations—particularly in the United States—have made good progress in their financial consolidation efforts and are in a better financial position to increase investment spending.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This September 2002 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that during the second quarter of 2002, a sharp erosion of investor confidence heightened risk aversion and growing concerns about the strength and durability of the global recovery. The pace and quality of corporate earnings had repercussions in all of the major equity, credit, and foreign exchange markets. Market adjustments occurred against the background of the bursting of the telecom, media, and technology bubble, which exposed a culture of irrational exuberance, and sometimes greed, among many buyers, sellers, and intermediaries.