Flagships > Global Financial Stability Report

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • Type: Journal Issue x
Clear All Modify Search
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The October 2013 Global Financial Stability Report examines current risks facing the global financial system at it undergoes a series of transitions along the path toward greater financial stability. The United States may soon move to less accommodative monetary policies and higher long-term interest rates as its recovery gains ground. Emerging markets face a transition to more volatile external conditions and higher risk premiums. Japan is moving toward the new “Abenomics” policy regime, and the euro area is moving toward a more robust and safer financial sector. Finally, the global banking system is phasing in stronger regulatory standards. Chapter 1 examines the challenges and risks of each of these transitions. Chapter 2 looks at efforts by policymakers to revive weak credit growth, which has been seen by many as a primary reason behind the slow economic recovery. The chapter argues that policies are most effective if they target the constraints that underlie the weakness in credit. But it cautions policymakers to be aware of the fiscal costs and implications for financial stability of credit-supporting policies. Chapter 3 examines how banking funding structures matter for financial stability and the potential impact of various regulatory reforms. It concludes that careful implementation of reform efforts are important to ensure that financial stability benefits are realized.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The September 2011 Global Financial Stability Report cautions that the risks to global financial stability have increased substantially in recent months, during which heavy public debt burdens and weak growth prospects in many advanced economies combined with a series of shocks to the global financial system. Emerging markets, despite brighter growth prospects, face the risk of sharp reversals and so must guard against the buildup of financial vulnerabilities. Moreover, as the crisis has moved into its fifth year, it has entered a new phase in which political differences within and across economies are impeding progress to address the legacies of the crisis. The Report examines how the ongoing low interest rate environment and high uncertainty are driving the asset allocations of long-term, real-money institutional investors. The Report also looks at variables that can act as advance indicators of financial crisis and examines how the use of countercyclical capital buffers can help to dampen destabilizing cycles.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report identifies potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crisis, while providing comprehensive coverage of mature and emerging financial markets. The GFSR focuses on current conditions in global financial markets, highlighting issues that could pose risks to financial market stability and market access by emerging market borrowers. The October 2008 GFSR reflects information available up to September 15, 2008.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report (GSFR), published twice a year by the IMF, provides timely analysis of developments in mature and emerging market countries and seeks to identify potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crisis. The GFSR aims to deepen its readers’ understanding of global capital flows, which play a critical role as an engine of world economic growth. Along with the IMF’s semiannual World Economic Outlook, the GFSR is a key vehicle for the IMF’s multilateral surveillance. The Global Financial Stability Report was created to provide a more frequent assessment of global financial markets and to address emerging market financing in a global context. The report focuses on current conditions in global financial markets, highlighting issues of financial imbalances, and of a structural nature, that could pose risks to financial market stability and sustained market access by emerging market borrowers. The GFSR focuses on relevant contemporary issues, not attempting to be a comprehensive survey of all potential risks. It also draws out the financial ramifications of economic imbalances highlighted by the IMF’s World Economic Outlook. It regularly contains, as a special feature, articles on structural or systemic issues relevant to international financial stability.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This paper focuses on risk transfer and discusses the insurance sector, particularly life insurers. It expands on issues raised in previous Global Financial Stability Reports by asking whether financial stability has benefited or could benefit from insurers’ broader participation in credit markets, including credit derivatives. The paper assesses the impact on financial stability of life insurers’ investment behavior and risk management in the largest mature markets. It highlights that the policy implications differ from market to market, and may offer useful lessons to emerging market countries with developing capital markets.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This paper looks at the longer-term challenges pension funds face as population age and key issues to address to enhance their risk management practices and their role as long-term investors. The paper focuses primarily on Japan, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States, where funded pension plans are most developed. The size of pension savings in these countries, their projected growth, and the recent development of funded pension schemes in other countries highlight the fast-growing importance of pension funds for international capital markets and to financial stability.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This September 2004 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that over the past six months, the global financial system, especially the health of financial intermediaries, has been further strengthened by the broadening economic recovery. The financial system has not looked as resilient as it does in the summer of 2004, in the three years since the bursting of the equity bubble. Financial intermediaries, banks and nonbanks alike, have strengthened their balance sheets to a point where they could, if necessary, absorb considerable shocks.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This September 2003 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that since March 2003, further progress has been made in addressing the lingering effects of the bursting of the equity price bubble. Household and corporate balance sheets have continued to improve gradually and corporate default levels have declined. Companies in mature markets have cut costs, enhancing their ability to cope with slower growth and other potential difficulties. Corporations—particularly in the United States—have made good progress in their financial consolidation efforts and are in a better financial position to increase investment spending.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This March 2003 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that the supportive stance of monetary policy in the major economies, coupled with more risk-averse behavior by both institutional and retail investors, has contributed to a sizable buildup of cash positions. A partial mobilization of these cash positions in the fourth quarter of 2002 helped fuel a short-lived stock market rally, led to a narrowing of credit spreads on mature and emerging bonds, and contributed to an increase in flows to emerging market borrowers.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This September 2002 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that during the second quarter of 2002, a sharp erosion of investor confidence heightened risk aversion and growing concerns about the strength and durability of the global recovery. The pace and quality of corporate earnings had repercussions in all of the major equity, credit, and foreign exchange markets. Market adjustments occurred against the background of the bursting of the telecom, media, and technology bubble, which exposed a culture of irrational exuberance, and sometimes greed, among many buyers, sellers, and intermediaries.