Official Reports and Documents > IMF Speeches

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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde delivered this speech at the World Bank/IMF Annual Meetings in Washington, D.C., on October 10, 2014.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Daring the Difference: The Three L’s of Women’s Empowerment. Speech delivered by IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde in May, 2014.

International Monetary Fund. Communications Department

Abstract

This paper discusses various aspects of economic inclusion and financial integrity. The consecration of capitalism comes during the 19th century. With the industrial revolution came Karl Marx, who focused on the appropriation of the means of production—and who predicted that capitalism, in its excesses, carried the seeds of its own destruction, the accumulation of capital in the hands of a few, mostly focused on the accumulation of profits, leading to major conflicts and cyclical crises. Trust, opportunity, rewards for all within a market economy—allowing everyone’s talents to flourish are the attributes of inclusive capitalism. The most recent poll conducted by the Edelman Trust Barometer, for example, showed that less than a fifth of those surveyed believed that governments or business leaders would tell the truth on an important issue. By making capitalism more inclusive, capitalism can be made more effective, and possibly more sustainable. However, if inclusive capitalism is not an oxymoron, it is not intuitive either, or it is more of a constant quest than a definitive destination.

Ms. Christine Lagarde

Abstract

This chapter presents the content of the Richard Dimbleby lecture, which has been delivered by an influential business or a political figure every year since 1972. Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the IMF, delivered the 2014 lecture at Guildhall in London on February 3. The 44 nations gathering at Bretton Woods have been determined to set a new course based on the principle that peace and prosperity flow from the font of cooperation. Fundamentally, the new multilateralism needs to instil a broader sense of social responsibility on the part of all players in the modern global economy. A renewed commitment to openness and to the mutual benefits of trade and foreign investment is requested. It also requires collective responsibility for managing an international monetary system that has travelled light-years since the old Bretton Woods system. The collective responsibility would translate into all monetary institutions cooperating closely mindful of the potential impact of their policies on others.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Quatre commentaires d'Alassane D. Ouattara

International Monetary Fund

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Extraits de discours de Michel Camdessus

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Fragmentos de discursos seleccionados de Michael Camdessus

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper presents four commentaries by an IMF Deputy Managing Director on integration and growth in a globalized world economy. Globalized and integrated financial markets are the norm, complete with their tremendous opportunities—the chance to quicken the pace of investment, job creation, and growth—and, some inevitable risks. The paper also highlights that sound macroeconomic policies must be a top priority, and that these policies must be supported by transparency and accountability. Policies at the country and global level must be mutually reinforcing; industrial countries meeting the more outward-oriented policies of developing countries with greater openness around the world. It is recommended that the IMF agenda must include adopting bold structural reforms and building a social consensus for reform through economic security, good governance, and a better dialogue with civil society in Africa. In the Berlin address, it is suggested that development rests on three pillars: good economic policy, a favorable legal and political environment, and attention to equitable social development.

Michel Camdessus

Abstract

This paper explains various challenges posed by the new global economy for the IMF. The urgent tasks of restoring stability to crisis-ridden countries have been accompanied by other more far-reaching questions. The five speeches included in this collection cover a broad range of activities and thinking over the past year. The themes range from immediate crisis management to the broad questions of a new architecture for the global economy; and from the specific concerns of individual countries and regions to the conditions for a strong and equitable world economy. One of the speeches, delivered in September 1998, steps back from prevailing worldwide market turbulence, seeking lessons from the crises, and stressing that conditions vary extensively among emerging economies. Clear, calm analysis is essential by market participants to differentiate among economies. Another speech sets out initial thoughts not just on the key elements of a new financial architecture, however, also on the role that can be played by each constituency in the world economy.