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International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Finance and Development, June 2016
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Finances & Développement, juin 2016
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Finance and Development, June 2016
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Finance and Development, June 2016
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Finanzas y Desarrollo, junio de 2016
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This article profiles iconoclastic economist Dani Rodrik, the Harvard professor whose warnings about the downsides of globalization proved prescient. Rodrik has spent most of his professional life at Ivy League institutions. He has a bachelor’s degree from Harvard and master’s and PhD degrees from Princeton, followed by a teaching career at Harvard and Columbia. Rodrik’s warnings that the benefits of free trade were more apparent to economists than to others were prescient. His skepticism about the benefits of unfettered flows of capital across national boundaries is now conventional wisdom. His successful attack on the so-called Washington Consensus of policies to generate economic growth has made governments and international organizations like the IMF and the World Bank admit that there are many policy recipes that can generate growth. Rodrik’s caution about financial globalization is now widely shared, including at the IMF.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Africa's Middle-Class Motor finds growing evidence that a recent resurgence in the continent's economic well-being has staying power. In his overview article, Harvard professor Calestous Juma says the emphasis for too long has been on eradicating poverty through aid rather than promoting prosperity through improved infrastructure, education, entrepreneurship, and trade. That is now changing: there is a growing emphasis on policies that produce a middle class. The new African middle class may not have the buying power of a Western middle class but it demands enough goods and services to support stronger economic growth, which, as IMF African Department head Antoinette Sayeh points out, in turn helps the poorest members of society. Oxford University economist Paul Collier discusses a crucial component of Africa's needed infrastructure: railways. It is a continent eminently suited to rail, development of which has been held back more by political than economic reasons. But even as sub-Saharan African thrives, its largest and most important economy, South Africa, has had an anemic performance in recent years. We also profile Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Nigeria's colorful economic czar. "Picture This" mines current trends to predict what Africa will look like a half century from now and "Data Spotlight" looks at increased regional trade in Africa. Elsewhere, Cornell Professor Eswar Prasad, examines a global role reversal in which emerging, not advanced, economies are displaying resilience in the face of the global economic crisis. The University of Queensland's John Quiggin, who wrote Zombie Economics, examines whether it makes sense in many cases to sell public enterprises. Economists Raghuram Rajan of the University of Chicago and Rodney Ramcharan of the U.S. Federal Reserve find clues to current asset booms and busts in the behavior of U.S. farmland prices a century ago.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Young people, hardest hit by the global economic downturn, are speaking out and demanding change. F&D looks at the need to urgently address the challenges facing youth and create opportunities for them. Harvard professor David Bloom lays out the scope of the problem and emphasizes the importance of listening to young people in "Youth in the Balance." "Making the Grade" looks at how to teach today's young people what they need to get jobs. IMF Deputy Managing Director, Nemat Shafik shares her take on the social and economic consequences of youth unemployment in our "Straight Talk" column. "Scarred Generation" looks at the effects the global economic crisis had on young workers in advanced economies, and we hear directly from young people across the globe in "Voices of Youth." Renminbi's rise, financial system regulation, and boosting GDP by empowering women. Also in the magazine, we examine the rise of the Chinese currency, look at the role of the credit rating agencies, discuss how to boost the empowerment of women, and present our primer on macroprudential regulation, seen as increasingly important to financial stability. People in economics - C. Fred Bergsten, American Globalist Back to basics - The multi-dimensional role of banks in our financial systems.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Young people, hardest hit by the global economic downturn, are speaking out and demanding change. F&D looks at the need to urgently address the challenges facing youth and create opportunities for them. Harvard professor David Bloom lays out the scope of the problem and emphasizes the importance of listening to young people in "Youth in the Balance." "Making the Grade" looks at how to teach today's young people what they need to get jobs. IMF Deputy Managing Director, Nemat Shafik shares her take on the social and economic consequences of youth unemployment in our "Straight Talk" column. "Scarred Generation" looks at the effects the global economic crisis had on young workers in advanced economies, and we hear directly from young people across the globe in "Voices of Youth." Renminbi's rise, financial system regulation, and boosting GDP by empowering women. Also in the magazine, we examine the rise of the Chinese currency, look at the role of the credit rating agencies, discuss how to boost the empowerment of women, and present our primer on macroprudential regulation, seen as increasingly important to financial stability. People in economics - C. Fred Bergsten, American Globalist Back to basics - The multi-dimensional role of banks in our financial systems.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Los jóvenes, el grupo más afectado por la desaceleración económica mundial, se están movilizando y exigen un cambio. En esta edición de F&D “Los jóvenes reclaman cambio”, se analiza la necesidad de abordar con urgencia los desafíos a los que se enfrentan los jóvenes y crear oportunidades para ellos. El profesor de Harvard David Bloom evalúa el alcance del problema y subraya la importancia de escuchar a los jóvenes en “Futuro incierto”. En “Sacar buena nota " se analiza cómo impartir a los jóvenes de hoy en día los conocimientos que necesitan para conseguir empleo. La Subdirectora Gerente del FMI, Nemat Shafik, comparte su opinión sobre las consecuencias económicas y sociales del desempleo juvenil en “Hablando claro”. En “Generación marcada” se analiza el efecto de la crisis económica mundial en los jóvenes trabajadores de las economías avanzadas, y en “Hablan los jóvenes” conversamos directamente con varios jóvenes de todo el mundo. Se analizan la regulación del sistema financiero y el impulso al PIB mediante el empoderamiento de las mujeres. En esta revista también examinamos el ascenso del renmimbi, analizamos el papel de las agencias de calificación crediticia, debatimos cómo potenciar el papel de la mujer y presentamos los principios básicos de la regulación macroprudencial, que es cada vez más importante para la estabilidad financiera. En “Gente del mundo de la economía”, trazamos una semblanza de Fred Bergsten, “Un mundialista estadounidense”. En “Vuelta a lo esencial” estudiamos el papel multidimensional de los bancos en nuestros sistemas financieros.