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International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.
In the attached letter, the Somali authorities request an extension of the date on which the arrangement under the Extended Credit Facility (ECF) will automatically expire unless a review is completed to August 17, 2022. On March 25, 2020, the Executive Board approved Somalia’s HIPC Initiative Decision Point1 and a three-year arrangement under the ECF.2 The first review under the ECF arrangement was completed by the Executive Board on November 18, 2020.3 However, as no review has been completed since then, the ECF arrangement is set to automatically expire on May 17, 2022, in line with the rule on automatic expiration of ECF arrangements if no review has been completed for 18 months. Under Fund policy, the Board may decide to delay the automatic expiry of the arrangement by up to three months if staff and the authorities appear close to reaching understandings on targets and measures to put the ECF-supported program back on track.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted Tanzania’s macroeconomic outlook. The Tanzanian authorities are implementing a comprehensive emergency pandemic response plan to help mitigate the significant socioeconomic and health effects of the crisis, resulting in an ongoing urgent balance of payments need.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper refers to Seychelles’ Request for Purchase Under the Rapid Financing Instrument (RFI). The near-term economic fallout of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is expected to be severe. Restriction in travel will hinder tourism and weaken fiscal and external positions, creating large additional financing needs. The authorities reacted swiftly by taking immediate measures of containment, including border closures, strengthening health policy responses and supporting households and firms. The emergency IMF support under the RFI provides timely resources to the authorities to address the urgent balance of payments and budgetary needs. The assistance of other international financial institutions and development partners is crucial to close the remaining financing gaps, ease the adjustment burden, and preserve economic growth. The authorities are committed to transparency and good governance in the use of emergency financing by providing monthly reports of pandemic-related expenditure to the National Assembly and undertaking an independent audit of such spending and procurement and publishing the results.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper analyzes Dominican Republic’s Request for Purchase Under the Rapid Financing Instrument (RFI). The RFI provides timely resources to the authorities which they intend to mobilize for essential coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related health expenditure and support to the vulnerable population. The pandemic has significantly weakened the Dominican Republic’s macroeconomic outlook for 2020 and created financing needs that require additional support. The authorities are also seeking support from other multilateral institutions. Macroeconomic and financial policies have been accommodative in response to the pandemic. The temporary fiscal measures to accommodate higher public healthcare spending and targeted transfers to the most vulnerable are appropriate. The IMF emergency assistance under the RFI is expected to help provide the much-needed resources to address the urgent balance of payments needs and support essential COVID-19-related health expenditure. The support of other international financial institutions and development partners would be crucial to close the remaining financing gaps, ease the adjustment burden, and preserve the Dominican Republic’s dynamic economic growth.
International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.
This Technical Assistance Mission has been undertaken to support the Bank of South Sudan (BSS) in improving external sector statistics (ESS). The recommendations made during the 2018 mission for the recording of oil exports and transactions with Sudan under the Transitional Financial Agreement were implemented by the BSS. The mission worked toward enhancing the inter-agency cooperation by meeting with selected public sector bodies, providing them with an overview of the balance of payments and the data that the BSS will request from them. Before the end of the mission, requested data from one of the entities, the Civil Aviation Authority was provided. A work program was developed to conduct a visitor expenditure survey and a preliminary International Reserves and Foreign Currency Liquidity template was submitted to IMF’s Statistics Department for review. In order to support progress in the various work areas, the mission recommended a detailed one-year action plan, with the several priority recommendations carrying weight to make headway in improving ESS reliability.
International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
This Climate Change Policy Assessment (CCPA) takes stock of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM)’s climate response plans, from the perspective of their macroeconomic and fiscal implications. CCPA explores the possible impact of climate change and natural disasters and the cost of FSM’s planned response. It suggests macroeconomically relevant reforms that could strengthen the national strategy and identifies policy gaps and resource needs. FSM has made progress toward its Nationally Determined Contribution mitigation pledge by beginning to expand renewable power generation and improve its efficiency. The authorities plan to continue this and encourage the take-up of energy efficient building design and appliances. Accelerating adaptation investments is paramount, which requires addressing critical capacity constraints and increasing grant financing. It is recommended that FSM needs to increase its capacity to address natural disaster risks following the expiry of Compact-related assistance in 2023. It is advised to improve climate data collection and use, including on the costs of high and low intensity disasters and disaster response expenditure.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This Selected Issues paper examines the underlying causes of the Central African Republic’s “fragility trap” and sheds light on factors linked to building resilience. The persist fragility in the Central African Republic can be attributed to several factors: lack of political cohesion and state weakness that led to protracted political crises and conflicts, weak capacity and poor commitment to building economic institutions, and the inability to generate or appropriately use fiscal buffers. The findings underscore the need for promoting peaceful and inclusive societies; strong international support; and building effective, accountable, and inclusive institutions—especially fiscal institutions—as a foundation for building resilience in the Central African Republic’s exit from fragility.