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International Monetary Fund

in at least those of the nine international treaties listed in the Annex to the Convention to which the country is a party (“treaty offences”); and (ii) terrorist acts as defined in the generic definition set out in Article 2 (b) (“generic offences”). “Treaty offences” Article 4 , paragraph 1 (a) of the Convention refers to nine treaties, contained in the Annex to the Convention, and makes it an offense to provide or collect funds with the intention or in the knowledge that these funds will be used to carry out an offense defined in one of the listed

International Monetary Fund

Treaty offences not consistent with art.2.1(a); not all Treaty offences included in the list of terrorist acts; international organisations not covered; FT attempt is not fully covered. No criminalisation of sole knowing funding of terrorist individuals and terrorist organisations. Effectiveness issue: minimal number of convictions. SR.III Freeze and confiscate terrorist assets LC There is no indication of effective implementation of the guidelines recently issued for the DNFBP sector. There is no monitoring mechanism in place to ensure

International Monetary Fund
India faces a range of money laundering and terrorist financing risks. India continues to be a target for terrorist groups and has been the victim of numerous attacks. Based on a threat assessment, it was found that India's major sources for terrorist financing (FT) were funds/resources from organizations outside India, counterfeiting of currency, and criminal activities. Key recommendations made to India included the need to address the technical shortcomings in the criminalization of both money laundering and terrorist financing and domestic framework of confiscation and provisional measures.
International Monetary Fund
Palau’s detailed assessment report on Anti-Money Laundering (AML) and Combating the Financing of Terrorism (CFT) has been examined. Palau has strengthened its AML/CFT legislative framework that has been in place since 2001 with the amendments to the Money Laundering and Proceeds of Crime Act of 2001 (MLPCA) and the Financial Institutions Act of 2001, as well as the enactments of the Counter-Terrorism Act of 2007 and the Cash Courier Disclosure Act of 2007. The offense of money laundering is criminalized in the MLPCA.
International Monetary Fund

provision, it would therefore appear that all crimes defined in the 12 international terrorism conventions listed in Section 3 (q) would automatically fall within the scope of the definition of “terrorism offenses,” regardless of whether or not Palau has signed and ratified the convention. This view was also held by the authorities. 121. Therefore, even though the law does not use the definition of “terrorist acts” as contained in the FATF glossary, all treaty offenses are covered by Palau’s definition of “terrorism offenses” and are, therefore, within the scope of the

International Monetary Fund
In this study, antimoney laundering and counterterrorist financing measures (AML/CFT) were summarized. The measures taken to strengthen the financing system are analyzed. Albania’s level of compliance with financial action task force (FATF) is assessed. Legal systems and related institutional measures are also explained. The preventive measures for financial institutions and nonfinancial businesses have also been ascribed. Finally, national and international cooperation has been discussed. The relevant issues related to AML/CFT measures have been analyzed in this paper.
International Monetary Fund

specific purpose or intent requirements on all terrorist acts including the conduct that must be made offences under the treaties annexed to the FT Convention. The current provisions apply the purpose/intent requirements found in Article 2 para. 1(b) of the Convention also to the conduct specified in Article 2 para 1(a) of the Convention (incorporating conduct specified in annexed treaties). Such specific intent or purpose requirements should not apply in the case of Article 2 para. 1(a) treaty offences. 209. Also, the offence as defined in Article 230 has a purpose to