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Shu-Chin Yang and Samuel Lipkowitz

to be, a handbook for solving the energy problems of a country or a region. But its perusal and study by those concerned with energy problems should broaden their comprehension of the multi-faceted problems which face entrepreneurs and policymakers everywhere. The specialist, be he power engineer, fuel or transport economist, or economic planner, will find useful the summaries of available data bearing on some alternative choices, but the author is careful to economize his space and to avoid boring digressions of possible interest only to a very limited group of

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper examines the importance of national planning for economic development of a country. The paper highlights that when World War II began, Soviet Russia was the only country engaged in systematic development planning, and then only since 1929, when its First Five-Year Plan was approved. At the end of the War, Asian countries that either had, or were about to, become independent, embraced planning to a much greater extent than countries in any other region.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Albert Waterston

Almost every country in the world today has a national plan for economic development. Yet before World War II plans of this kind were rare and, apart from the Russian Five-Year Plans, almost unknown. This article, condensed from a chapter in the author’s forthcoming hook, Development Planning: Lessons of Experience, traces in outline the prodigious growth of development planning in the postwar world.

George Tobias

International aid for education is now being provided on a vast scale. In this article the author indicates some of the things that need to he known and some of the things that ought to he done to help make this aid fully effective.

Rudolf Kroc

In the article “Introduction to the Fund,” which appeared in Vol. 1, No. 1, of Finance and Development, an outline was given of the Fund’s finances. But the Fund is a unique institution, and a full understanding of its functioning requires more information than can be given in an introduction. This article, by the Fund’s Assistant Treasurer for Operations, is intended for readers who would like to achieve such a fuller understanding, particularly of the Fund’s actual day-to-day practice in the conduct of its operations. The second part of the article, dealing with the revolving character of the Fund’s resources, will appear in the next issue of Finance and Development. Introduction to the Fund, which appeared in the first issue of Finance and Development, is being reprinted in English, French, and Spanish, along with a Glossary of Fund Terms, in pamphlet form. It will be sent without charge on receipt of a postcard addressed to The Secretary, International Monetary Fund, 19th and H Streets, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20431. Please indicate language desired.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper examines the importance of national planning for economic development of a country. The paper highlights that when World War II began, Soviet Russia was the only country engaged in systematic development planning, and then only since 1929, when its First Five-Year Plan was approved. At the end of the War, Asian countries that either had, or were about to, become independent, embraced planning to a much greater extent than countries in any other region.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper examines the importance of national planning for economic development of a country. The paper highlights that when World War II began, Soviet Russia was the only country engaged in systematic development planning, and then only since 1929, when its First Five-Year Plan was approved. At the end of the War, Asian countries that either had, or were about to, become independent, embraced planning to a much greater extent than countries in any other region.

Poul Høst-Madsen

In the author’s view, public discussion too readily assumes that there has been a large and persistent capital flight from the developing countries. The article suggests that some widely publicized estimates of this flow may have tended to exaggerate its actual volume. The author believes that in the interest of the cause of development, greater caution should be shown in public discussion of this admittedly difficult problem.

Patrick Perry

The plans that have been made for developing Ireland’s economy form an interesting example of the postwar spread of development planning discussed in the preceding article. A fuller and more detailed account of Ireland’s economic planning appears in the March 1965 issue of the Fund’s Staff Papers.