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International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper and Statistical Appendix analyzes poverty and social development in Uganda. The paper reviews recent poverty and inequality trends, examines how poor people are coping with risk and vulnerability, analyzes the relationship between economic growth, structural reform and poverty, and describes the government policies in these areas. The paper also provides a brief overview of major institutional developments in Uganda’s financial sector since 1993 with regard to the legal, accounting, and general regulatory framework in which financial institutions operate.
International Monetary Fund

III. N et S ubsidies to P ublic E nterprises in U ganda 15 78. The reform of public enterprises (PEs) affects financial transactions between the government and PEs. Moreover, since savings in net subsidies or financial support to PEs provide scope for increasing expenditures in priority areas within a sustainable fiscal deficit, successful public enterprise reform is important for Uganda. This chapter discusses the evolution of net subsidies to PEs in Uganda between 1992/93 (July–June) and 1997/98, and identifies their causes and main recipients, thus

International Monetary Fund

Uganda Intervention in the Cooperative Bank, 1998–99 Text Tables 9. Financial Sector, end-December 1998 10. Financial Sector Legislation 11. Financial Sector Regulation 12. Transactions of Deposit Insurance Fund, 1994–February 1999 13. Concentration of the Commercial Banking Sector, 1995–98 14. Commercial Bank Market Share, End-December 1998 III. Net Subsidies to Public Enterprises in Uganda A. Definition of Net Subsidies B. Net Subsidies to PEs in Uganda Uganda Railways Corporation (URC) Uganda Commercial Bank (UCB) Uganda

Mr. Bernardin Akitoby, Mr. Gerd Schwartz, and Mr. Richard Hemming

, and focusing on whether subsidies to PEs are transparent, implemented through the budget, and available to private competitors. Based on these considerations, a flexible approach to the coverage of PEs in fiscal indicators seems warranted. First, over time, all IMF member countries should begin systematically to compile and disseminate statistics on the operations of their PEs, ideally in a form comparable to government statistics. But the decision as to whether fiscal reporting and monitoring, and fiscal indicators and targets, should focus on the

International Monetary Fund

, but raising compliance among PEs – currently none of which pay VAT– will be crucial both to bring deficits down in the future and for securing budget support from donors. The next step for direct taxes is to follow through with penalties for noncompliance, including nonfinancial ones. On subsidies, returning TMTS referrals to a committee of doctors should begin to bring costs down. The authorities should also continue to coordinate with donors to ensure scholarships remain at a sustainable level and bring subsidies to PEs transparently on budget. Public wage

International Monetary Fund

no obvious comparator in the private sector and their accounting may be difficult to interpret, which would call for using broader benchmarks of performance; and finally, the analysis of subsidies should recognize that even some private firms perform QFAs and receive subsidies. It is therefore important to look at whether subsidies to PEs are transparent, implemented through the budget, and available to private competitors. C. The Way Forward 36. Based on the considerations above, the staff proposes a modified approach to the coverage issue

International Monetary Fund
This paper reports on findings from eight pilot country studies on public investment that were carried out during the second half of 2004. The pilot country studies covered a diverse group of countries. Specifically, they included countries in Latin America (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Peru), Africa (Ethiopia and Ghana), the Middle East (Jordan), and Asia (India).
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses Tuvalu’s economic condition, internal happenings, external linkages, and climate. The country has reported slow economic growth after the global crisis. The export and economic expansions have been minimal with many of its goods imported. The main source of income for the country continue to be remittances from its citizens working abroad and donor assistance. The government has laid out a rigid agenda for improving fiscal strength, literacy rate, power, health, and reducing nonpriority expenditure. The authorities believe that these challenges have given a fighting spirit to the country.