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Andrea Deghi, Mr. Fabio M Natalucci, and Mahvash S Qureshi
After dropping sharply in the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, commercial real estate prices are on the mend. However, the initial price decline, as well as the pace of recovery, vary widely across regions and different segments of the commercial real estate market. This note analyzes the factors that explain this divergence using city-level data from major advanced and emerging market economies. The findings show that pandemic-specific factors such as the stringency of containment measures and the spread of the virus are strongly associated with a decline in prices, while fiscal support and easy financial conditions maintained by central banks have helped to cushion the shock. A higher vaccination rate has aided the recovery of the sector, especially in the retail segment. Structural changes in private behavior such as the trend toward teleworking and e-commerce have also had an impact on commercial property prices in some segments. The outlook of the sector across regions thus remains closely tied to the trajectory of the pandemic and broader macroeconomic recovery, financial market conditions, and the pace of structural shifts in the demand for specific property types. In an environment of tightening financial conditions and a slowdown in economic activity, continued vigilance is warranted on the part of financial supervisors to minimize financial stability risks stemming from potential adverse shocks to the sector.
Mr. Ippei Shibata
Using the U.S. Current Population Survey data, this paper compares the distributional impacts of the Pandemic Crisis and those of the Global Financial Crisis in terms of (i) worker characteristics, (ii) job characteristics–“social” (where individuals interact to consume goods), “teleworkable” (where individuals have the option of working at home), and “essential” jobs (which were not subject to government mandated shut-downs during the recent recession), and (iii) wage distributions. We find that young and less educated workers have always been affected more in recessions, while women and Hispanics were more severely affected during the Pandemic Recession. Surprisingly, teleworkable, social and essential jobs have been historically less cyclical. This historical acyclicality of teleworkable occupations is attributable to its higher share of skilled workers. Unlike during the Global Financial Crisis, however, employment in social industries fell more whereas employment in teleworkable and essential jobs fell less during the Pandemic Crisis. Lastly, during both recessions, workers at low-income earnings have suffered more than top-income earners, suggesting a significant distributional impact of the two recessions.
Mr. Ippei Shibata

Using the U.S. Current Population Survey data, this paper compares the distributional impacts of the Pandemic Crisis and those of the Global Financial Crisis in terms of (i) worker characteristics, (ii) job characteristics–“social” (where individuals interact to consume goods), “teleworkable” (where individuals have the option of working at home), and “essential” jobs (which were not subject to government mandated shut-downs during the recent recession), and (iii) wage distributions. We find that young and less educated workers have always been affected more in recessions, while women and Hispanics were more severely affected during the Pandemic Recession. Surprisingly, teleworkable, social and essential jobs have been historically less cyclical. This historical acyclicality of teleworkable occupations is attributable to its higher share of skilled workers. Unlike during the Global Financial Crisis, however, employment in social industries fell more whereas employment in teleworkable and essential jobs fell less during the Pandemic Crisis. Lastly, during both recessions, workers at low-income earnings have suffered more than top-income earners, suggesting a significant distributional impact of the two recessions.

International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

’s assessment that the 2017 CA balance and the projected 2018 CA balance are broadly in line with fundamentals and desired polies, as well as related policy recommendations . As we have mentioned above, the authorities will promote fiscal consolidation as well as structural reforms, including labor market reforms. We welcome the fact that staff does not apply the adjustor related to increased energy imports due to shut downs of nuclear power reactors for the preliminary 2018 CA external assessment. Also, we highly appreciate candid and close dialogue between staff and the

Mr. Gerd Schwartz and SILVA LOPES PAULO

(billions of DM) Total income 1.60 7.74 11.59 From privatization 1.52 7.41 9,47 Other income 0.08 0.33 2.12 Total expenditures 5.89 27.62 41.19 Privatization 0.04 1.09 4,58 Restructuring 1.34 13.21 10.90 Shut-downs 0.02 1.01 7.47 Administrative expenses 0.14 0.88 1.42 interest expenditures 9.86 8.27 Legally mandated expenditures 4.35 1.57 8.55 Deficit (-) -4.29 -19.88 -29.60 Guarantees issued 28.40 30.23 26

International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues Paper focuses on the Heritage and Stabilization Fund (HSF) and development in the energy sector in Trinidad and Tobago. The HSF, established in 2007, is an important national asset, which has broad-based political and social support. The HSF has developed a strong record since its creation. It has performed well as measured by the accumulation of savings, the portfolio return, and adherence to the Santiago Principles for transparency and governance. This is particularly commendable given global and domestic financial crises.