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technical nature but raise fundamental questions of economic theory and principles. The concepts and classifications used in the System have a considerable impact on the ways in which the data may be used and the interpretations placed on them. 1. The production boundary 1.20. The activity of production is fundamental. In the System, production is understood to be a physical process, carried out under the responsibility, control and management of an institutional unit, in which labour and assets are used to transform inputs of goods and services into outputs

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activities within the 1993 SNA production boundary, the goal of the national statistical system is to reduce as far as possible the incidence of non-observed activities and to ensure that those remaining are appropriately measured and included in the GDP estimates. 3.2. As noted in Chapter 1 , the groups of activities most likely to be non-observed are those that are underground, illegal, informal sector , or undertaken by households for their own final use . Activities may also be missed because of deficiencies in the basic data collection programme . These five

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is explained fully by the transactions (of the capital and financial accounts) and the other economic flows (the other changes in volume of assets account and revaluation account) (see Table 6 ). Other Related Issues in the 1993 SNA Other related issues include the volume and real income measures, quarterly national accounts (QNA) data, important boundaries (production boundary, asset boundary, and current and capital transfers), labor force indicators, multifactor productivity, environmental and economic accounting, and informal sector and illegal

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figures, or they are only implicit components of transactions which are estimated globally. 29.6 The second type of satellite analysis is mainly based on concepts that are alternatives to those of the SNA. The sorts of variations in the basic concepts that may be considered are discussed in section D. These include a different production boundary, an enlarged concept of consumption or capital formation, an extension of the scope of assets, and so on. Often a number of alternative concepts may be used at the same time. This second type of analysis may involve, like the

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activities that are capable of being provided by one unit to another. Not all activities that require the expenditure of time and effort by persons are productive in an economic sense, for example, activities such as eating, drinking or sleeping cannot be produced by one person for the benefit of another. 2. The production boundary 1.40 The activity of production is fundamental. In the SNA, production is understood to be a physical process, carried out under the responsibility, control and management of an institutional unit, in which labour and assets are used to