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International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.
A technical assistance mission was undertaken by the Real Sector Statistics Advisor in the Caribbean Regional Technical Assistance Centre to Saint Lucia to provide advice to the Central Statistics Office (CSO) on compiling rebased gross domestic product estimates. The CSO is responding to the needs of the Ministry of Finance for more robust and timely national accounts statistics. All the Gross domestic product by economic activity (GDP-P) compilation workbooks have now been redeveloped and revised current and constant 2018 price quarterly and annual estimates have been compiled up to Q3 2019. The incorporation of revised data on tourist expenditure for 2000 onward have also resulted in revisions to the GDP-P current rice estimates and real growth rates. The revised annual and quarterly GDP-P estimates were assessed, and several methodological improvements were implemented. Improvements were made to the constant price estimates by reviewing and replacing weaker volume indicators. Training on the methodological changes and compiling the rebased estimates has been provided. The training on methodological improvements included the use of the more representative employment indicators and various price indices discussed above; back-casting and linking techniques for the current price estimates and linking the constant 2006 price series with the constant 2018 price series.
International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

, replacing weaker volume indicators from the industrial production indices. The NIC employment data has now also been used for travel agents, professional services, other administrative and support services, and other personal and social services and several services industries, replacing less suitable indicators like population projections. 17. The IC and output price indices were also improved . The composite IC price index weights were updated for all industries using the SUT benchmark data, although these price indices are used mainly to reflate quarterly constant

International Monetary Fund

) firms e. Export taxes f. Export and import licensing g. Regional trade agreements h. Overview of Uruguay Round market access commitments 4. Future trade reform a. Tariff structure b. Surcharges, special protection, and tariff bindings c. Safeguards d. Export and import licensing e. Duty waivers and exemptions 5. Conclusions Text Tables 1. Colombo Consumer Price Index Weights 2. Alternative Colombo Consumer Price Indices, 1993–94 3. Selected International Comparison of External and Domestic Central Government Debt, 1989–93 4

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

expenditure approaches, and Supply and Use Tables are disseminated for 2014–16 and Input-Output Tables for 2005 and 2014. In addition, a monthly index of economic activity (IVAE), which is consistent with the quarterly and annual national accounts, is disseminated on a regular basis. The rebased national accounts and monthly index of economic activity series were published on March 23, 2018. Price Statistics : Price statistics are disseminated at monthly frequency. Consumer Price Index weights are based on the 2005–06 Household Income and Expenditure Survey. A broad

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

were published on March 23, 2018. Price Statistics : Price statistics are disseminated at monthly frequency. Consumer Price Index weights are based on the 2005–06 Household Income and Expenditure Survey. A broad PPI, with base year 2009, is compiled and disseminated on the website of the Central Reserve Bank. Government Finance Statistics : Public sector data is reported on a cash basis but is comprehensive and timely. Information on flow and stocks is published monthly for the different components of the nonfinancial public sector (NFPS). Public debt

Mr. Peter Isard and Mr. Steven A. Symansky

and foreign price indices (n and n* ), and the relative price of tradables across countries (b) . The equation confirms that, other things being equal, a rise in the domestic relative price of nontradables (PN/PT) leads to a real appreciation. More generally, however, it indicates that changes in real exchange rates over the long run can logically be related to different combinations of changes in the relative price of tradables across countries, changes in both domestic and foreign price-index weights, and changes in both the domestic and foreign relative