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Mr. Brad J. McDonald, Rob Gregory, and Ms. Katrin Elborgh-Woytek

. Preferential Duty-Free Access for LDC Exports to Developed Countries F igures Figure 1. LDC Exports and GDP, 1995–2008 (Share of world total, percent) Figure 2. LDC Exports, 1995–2008 (Share of total imports, percent) B oxes Box 1. What Have Countries Committed to on Market Access for LDCs? Box 2. Preferential Access for LDC Exports in Key Advanced Markets Box 3. Rules of Origin and Cumulation Provisions Box 4. LDC Preference Schemes of Major EMs E xecutive S ummary Lack of integration into the global economy is a major factor in

Mr. Brad J. McDonald, Rob Gregory, and Ms. Katrin Elborgh-Woytek

preferences could alone lead to increased annual LDC exports of some US$10 billion ( Laborde, 2008 , and Bouët and others, 2010 ), about 2 percent of LDC GDP, with other proposed reforms of preference schemes multiplying these benefits. 3 Complementary steps are also needed to cut distortions in world agricultural markets, help LDCs to meet product standards, and to provide more effective “Aid for Trade.” Box 1. What Have Countries Committed to on Market Access for LDCs? Recognizing that LDCs face special difficulties in responding to the challenges of

Mr. Brad J. McDonald, Rob Gregory, and Ms. Katrin Elborgh-Woytek
The actions proposed here focus on trade integration, substantially increasing exports of the poorest countries and helping them to meet the Millennium Development Goals. As the foundation for these ambitions, we emphasize the role of a secure, open global trading environment—strengthened further by concluding the WTO Doha Round. From this base, the poorest countries also need better trade preferences from the advanced and major emerging market countries (EMs). Building the capacity to take advantage of trade opportunities will require support from the international community and policy reforms—such as to trade regimes—by the poorest countries themselves. The Fifteen Point Action Plan proposed here could increase annual exports of the least-developed countries (LDCs) by $10 billion or more, with additional benefits for other Low-Income Countries (LICs).