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Gabriel Soderberg, Ms. Marianne Bechara, Wouter Bossu, Ms. Natasha X Che, Sonja Davidovic, Mr. John Kiff, Ms. Inutu Lukonga, Mr. Tommaso Mancini Griffoli, Tao Sun, and Akihiro Yoshinaga

the technology and collaborates with the central bank to develop the CBDC. This “CBDC package solution” was chosen by the Bahamas (NZIA), the ECCB (Bitt), Sweden (Accenture), and Uruguay (Roberto Giori). In the case of Sweden and Uruguay, however, contractors were used to deliver a specific test solution and thus would not necessarily be relied upon to further develop, and potentially launch, CBDC. In the second approach, the central bank relies to a greater extent on internal resources and has different contractors for different areas as necessary. This approach

Gabriel Soderberg, Ms. Marianne Bechara, Wouter Bossu, Ms. Natasha X Che, Sonja Davidovic, Mr. John Kiff, Ms. Inutu Lukonga, Mr. Tommaso Mancini Griffoli, Tao Sun, and Akihiro Yoshinaga
Ms. Margaret Cotton and Gregory Dark
This technical note is the second of three addressing information technology (IT) themes and issues relevant to tax administrations. This note addresses how to select a suitable IT system for core tax administration functions. Note one covers the use of IT in tax administrations and how to develop an information technology strategic plan (ITSP). The third note focuses on implementation of a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) system. These technical notes are primarily for tax administrations that have no technology to manage their core tax processes, or their technology is limited and outdated. These notes focus on core tax functions and do not address other business systems (e.g., payroll, finance, document, and asset management systems).
Ms. Margaret Cotton and Gregory Dark

allows different workflow and approval points etc. so most needs should be able to be catered for without actually customizing the product itself. The tax administration should make every effort to ensure that software customization at code level is kept to an absolute minimum, as customization will defeat the purpose of selecting a COTS package solution and will greatly increase the cost (and likely reduce the benefit) of the overall IT systems upgrade. Typically, organizations that opt for COTS solutions for their IT needs consider adapting their internal

essentially assure third parties of the provenance of the data subject’s identity, data and documents underpinning their balance sheet. This is a powerful basis for establishing trust, reducing the key friction of asymmetric information that impedes the offering of financial services. If successful it should offer a package solution to third parties wishing to offer financial services to data subjects, encompassing a model of management of data usage of households and small businesses within the regulatory perimeter. The rationale for ensuring that open banking involves

International Monetary Fund

, appeals, legal, human resource management, statistics) are fully involved in the process, as it is critical that the business units” fully endorse the final software package solution chosen. By including the business units in all stages, the project will be recognized within the STI as a business led project and not just an IT initiative. 122. Care should be taken to minimize any customization of the new software packet. Typically, businesses or government institutions who opt for COTS for their IT needs, consider all options for adapting their internal business

International Monetary Fund

a new system (the future state report). In this context, it must be ensured that the STI’s business units (e.g., taxpayer registration, returns processing, payment and arrears management, audit, investigation, appeals, legal, human resource management, statistics) are fully involved in the process, as it is critical that the business units” fully endorse the final software package solution chosen. By including the business units in all stages, the project will be recognized within the STI as a business led project and not just an IT initiative. 122. Care should

International Monetary Fund
This report concerns the delivery of a tax administration mission to Moldova during February 8 – 21, 2012 by the Fiscal Affairs Department (FAD) of the IMF as a component of implementing FAD's technical assistance strategy for Southeast Europe.
International Monetary Fund
This report discusses implementation of the compliance risk model (CRM) by Moldova’s tax department. The CRM has shown encouraging results in 2011, in terms of extra revenue. However, the assessment reports that for long-lasting impact, the model requires further improvement in taxpayer services, audit, tax fraud investigations, information technology, and the value-added tax refund system. The compliance plan for 2012 involves implementing measures within the segment of wealthy individuals.
Mr. Pokar D Khemani and Mr. Jack Diamond
In the past decade, developing countries (DCs) have been encouraged to reform their public expenditure management systems and have increasingly embarked on major projects to computerize their government operations. Most popular among these have been projects to computerize government accounting and payment operations, by introducing government financial management information systems (FMISs). This paper investigates the reason for almost universal failure to implement and sustain FMISs in DCs. It starts with a review of the "received wisdom" in implementing these projects, and then analyzes problems in its application in the DC context to identify key factors to explain why FMIS projects have been so problematic. Based on the identified negative factors, suggestions for addressing them are offered in the hope of improving success rates.