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International Monetary Fund. Finance Dept. and International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

allocates them to outputs, with the single most important input being self-reported time. Support and governance costs are tracked as intermediate inputs that feed into the production of outputs. For details on ACES, see “FY2015 Administrative and Capital Expenses and Output Cost Estimates”, Box 2. 2 In developing ACES, a balance was struck between precision (for meaningful results) and complexity (to not overburden staff in their time reporting). The goal of mapping at least 95 percent of gross administrative expenditures to a final output has been achieved

International Monetary Fund. Office of Budget and Planning
The paper presents highlights from the FY 2021 budget, followed by a discussion of outputs based on the Fund Thematic Categories and of inputs.
International Monetary Fund
Operating within a flat real budget envelope, the Fund delivered on the priorities and initiatives laid out in the Global Policy Agenda and Management’s Key Goals (MKGs). Resource pressures were addressed via implementation of streamlining initiatives, strategic reallocation of resources towards higher priority areas, and careful budget management. In terms of outputs, spending in FY 16 continued the shift from crisis management to crisis prevention, in line with the MKGs. Output shifted moderately from multilateral surveillance and oversight of the global system to bilateral surveillance and capacity development. Lending activity expenditure remained broadly unchanged. Average country spending was broadly aligned with assessment of risk. The net administrative budget outturn in FY 16 was $1,038 million against an approved budget of $1,052 million. The modest underspend reflects the preservation of the contingency reserve and lower-than-planned travel expenditure. Relative to FY 15, higher budget execution led to a small real (0.8 percent) year-on-year increase in net expenditures. Total capital expenditures of $131 million were recorded in FY 16 out of the $435 million in available appropriations. HQ1 Renewal expenses made up 70 percent of the spending.
International Monetary Fund
The administrative expenditure outturn for FY2015 reflects continued budget discipline, as new demands and initiatives were accommodated through reprioritization and better use of existing resources within an unchanged envelope. The overall budget utilization rate of 98 percent was achieved through more efficient personnel management practices and effective reallocation of resources from underutilized areas to areas of emerging pressure. In terms of outputs, the Fund continued its focus on addressing global policy challenges and reducing vulnerabilities. Resources allocated to multilateral surveillance, oversight of the global systems and capacity development increased while bilateral surveillance and lending declined moderately, in line with easing of crisis-related work. Spending by country reflects a continued shift towards a more risk-based approach, consistent with the established priorities. Capital expenditures mainly reflected the major renovation of the HQ1 building and improvements in information technology infrastructure and security to better support the staff’s work and protect information assets.
International Monetary Fund. Office of Budget and Planning
The paper presents highlights from the FY 19 budget, followed by a discussion of outputs based on the Fund Thematic Categories and of inputs.
International Monetary Fund
With continued efforts to maximize the use of available resources, the FY 17 outturn represents a small increase in spending within a largely flat budget envelope. Reallocations from lower priority areas and efficiency gains, along with flexibility provided by carry forward resources enabled the Fund to deliver on the initiatives and priorities in the Global Policy Agenda and Management’s Key Goals. In terms of outputs, there was a small shift in spending from country and regional work to policy work. Within the former, spending moved from lending activities towards bilateral surveillance and capacity development. In terms of inputs, the structural budget was almost fully utilized. Highlights are presented followed by a discussion of the outputs and inputs. Details on capacity development are presented in the Annex.
International Monetary Fund. Office of Budget and Planning
The paper presents highlights from the FY 2020 budget, followed by a discussion of outputs based on the Fund Thematic Categories and of inputs.
International Monetary Fund. Finance Dept. and International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
The Fund continues to make efforts to maximize the use of available resources in order to deliver on the priorities and initiatives laid out in the Global Policy Agenda (GPA). The FY 18 outturn reflects reallocations and efficiency gains, as well as flexibility provided by carry forward resources. With the number of Fund arrangements falling, the Fund’s outputs shifted from spending on lending activity to multilateral surveillance. On the input side, the structural budget was fully utilized. This paper presents key highlights of the FY 18 outturn, including a discussion of the outputs and inputs. Details on Capacity Development (CD) are presented in Annex
International Monetary Fund

Program during FY 16. 1 This section describes the main trends in spending observed using the Analytic Costing and Estimation System (ACES), which has been in use since FY 11. The ACES model takes the Fund’s input costs and allocates them to outputs, with the single most important input being self-reported time. Support and governance costs are tracked as intermediate inputs that feed into the production of outputs. For details on ACES, see “FY2015 Administrative and Capital Expenses and Output Cost Estimates”, Box 2. 2 Direct spending refers to