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International Monetary Fund
This supplement reviews the data received thus far and the progress made by participating jurisdictions in their dissemination efforts. Data for major jurisdictions that declined to participate are also provided where it is available from published sources. In addition, data on a sample of advanced economies are provided for comparative purposes. The framework identified a minimum set of variables for dissemination and recommended that jurisdictions publish data on those variables although jurisdictions could choose to publish more. Tables 2 and 5 to 13 provide the data received on those variables. The framework also identified additional variables that were to be provided to the Fund to help Fund staff monitor developments in financial centers.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

finance available to a wider set of economic agents. Figure 5.1 Nonbank Assets (Regional averages in percent of GDP) Sources: World Bank, FinStats and World Development Indicators; and IMF staff calculations. Note: Nonbank assets are defined as the sum of insurance company assets and mutual fund assets as a percent of GDP. Simple average across countries. EM Asia = emerging Asia; LAC = Latin America and the Caribbean; Non-Asia/LAC EM = emerging market economies excluding Asia and LAC; LIC = low-income countries. To better capture different facets of

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

The factors that determine changes in asset allocation and, hence, capital flows across national borders and sectors have important implications for the conduct of surveillance of global financial markets. The fast growing importance of institutional investors, mostly in mature markets but increasingly in a number of emerging market economies, has two major consequences that are closely interrelated. On the one hand, these nonbank asset gatherers assume sizable market and credit risks, not the least through modern financial engineering, in the form of swaps

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

The factors that determine changes in asset allocation and, hence, capital flows across national borders and sectors have important implications for the conduct of surveillance of global financial markets. The fast growing importance of institutional investors, mostly in mature markets but increasingly in a number of emerging market economies, has two major consequences that are closely interrelated. On the one hand, these nonbank asset gatherers assume sizable market and credit risks, not the least through modern financial engineering, in the form of swaps

International Monetary Fund

SUMMARY Private nonbank capital transactions are underreported in many countries. International banking statistics provide alternative information for one category of nonbank transaction—deposits in and borrowings from foreign banks. For 1986–89, banking statistics show changes in nonbank assets that average $67 billion a year higher than counterpart changes in balance of payments statements. In liability comparisons they average about $45 billion higher than balance of payments figures. The banking statistics thus suggest that net capital outflows by