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Mr. Carlos Mulas-Granados, Mr. Richard Varghese, Vizhdan Boranova, Alice deChalendar, and Judith Wallenstein
We exploit a survey data set that contains information on how 11,000 workers across advanced and emerging market economies perceive the main forces shaping the future of work. In general, workers feel more positive than negative about automation, especially in emerging markets. We find that negative perceptions about automation are prevalent among workers who are older, poorer, more exposed to job volatility, and from countries with higher levels of robot penetration. Perceptions over automation are positively viewed by workers with higher levels of job satisfaction, higher educational attainment, and from countries with stronger labor protection. Workers with positive perceptions of automation also tend to respond that re-education and retraining will be needed to adapt to rapidly evolving skill demands. These workers expect governments to have a role in shaping the future of work through protection of labor and new forms of social benefits. The demand for protection and benefits is more significant among women and workers that have suffered job volatility.
Mr. Carlos Mulas-Granados, Mr. Richard Varghese, Vizhdan Boranova, Alice deChalendar, and Judith Wallenstein

Retraining i,j,c . These two variables capture how survey respondents i in industry j in country c view respectively the changing workforce structure as ‘needing more formal education to find a job’ (reeducation) or ‘more-on-the job training require to keep up’ (retraining). These two variables take three values: negative (1), neutral (2), or positive (3). As in the baseline specification, PC i,j,c is a vector that captures respondent characteristics. Finally, we include a dummy variable automation_pos i,j,c which takes value 1 when respondents had a positive

always important, but the resident advisors also helped to provide more specificity in designing the long-run strategies. Mr. Rimsevics (Bank of Latvia) remarked on the need to choose between specialized and general advisors. In their view, the more specialized advisors were perhaps more useful because they could provide more on-the-job training. Complementarity in Technical Assistance and Macroeconomic Activity During the afternoon meeting, Mr. Bascoul (BIS) reviewed their experience. He stressed the BIS’s concentration on the Joint Vienna Institute, banking

International Monetary Fund
This evaluation of technical assistance (TA) in statistics covers two post-conflict countries, namely, Mozambique and Rwanda during the period 2000–08. The TA, including training, covered the broad spectrum of the Statistics Department’s (STA) program, including collaboration with the East Africa Regional Technical Assistance Center (East AFRITAC), the U. K. Department for International Development (DFID), and the Japanese-funded General Data Dissemination System (GDDS) projects, as well as TA funded directly from the IMF’s budget. The emerging lessons also provide a useful guide to future TA to non-English-speaking countries. The evaluation is based on missions to each country and relied on responses to questionnaires, desk reviews of available data, and discussions with country authorities, donors, data users, and national officials who participated in IMF courses in statistics.
International Monetary Fund

terms of their technical skills and understanding of local conditions. However, they felt that the missions could have benefited from a longer duration to allow more on-the-job training. Courses in statistics were very beneficial but, in general, also could have been longer, with more time dedicated to practical examples and case studies. 33. Data users acknowledged improvements in the quality of, and access to, data but saw a need for further improvement . In particular, some commented on the need to enhance the quality and coverage of data; the latter at both the

International Monetary Fund
Key Messages • The Iraq Subaccount is a good example of donor coordination as expressed in the Paris Declaration. • Overall, the TAs funded from the Iraq TA Subaccount were successful, relevant, efficient and effective. • Ensuring long-term sustainability requires maintaining an adequate the level of TA activity in the future. • There were instances where more pro-active donor coordination was needed to build synergies to achieve development results. • While the offsite modality was fairly effective and cost efficient and delivered value for money, the limits of this model will be stretched as IMF moves from policy and operational advice and training to greater emphasis on supporting the implementation of policies and procedures. • The Fund’s internal monitoring needs to be strengthened, particularly the TA Information Management System. Reforms in this area are on track, supported by Fund management, and improvements are expected by 1 May 2008. • The Fund’s TA evaluation framework needs to be strengthened by instituting a system of self assessments of all completed TAs and developing guidelines for the ex-post evaluation of TAs. Work in these areas is planned. • The Fund delivered slightly more internally funded TA to Iraq than originally planned.
International Monetary Fund

; (ii) the strategy/diagnosis for the TA was particularly thorough at the inception of the program and at key stages during delivery of the seven workshops with the focus on classic supervision training for the earlier workshops (June 2004 to January 2006) moving to more on–the-job training in onsite and offsite practical supervision case study problems arising in the course of workshop participants’ actual work 16 at the CBI (November 2006 to July 2007) and then to focus on modalities of restructuring state owned banks after an MOU had been agreed by the CBI